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I can pass this guy...
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Hey guys/gals,

I'm currently going to school to get my CDL Class A(Community College, not a company). We have had some recruiters come by; Crete Carrier, Swift, Maverick, Schneider, Roehl, and a few others talk to us.

I was wondering if you have any recommendations on where to start and what to execpt. I'd much rather get into Regional or even day hauls vs. over the road. But I'm kind of guessing I'll have to do Over the road for a while before I'll get to do anything local...

Thought, comments, recommendations?
 

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Hey guys/gals,

I'm currently going to school to get my CDL Class A(Community College, not a company). We have had some recruiters come by; Crete Carrier, Swift, Maverick, Schneider, Roehl, and a few others talk to us.

I was wondering if you have any recommendations on where to start and what to execpt. I'd much rather get into Regional or even day hauls vs. over the road. But I'm kind of guessing I'll have to do Over the road for a while before I'll get to do anything local...

Thought, comments, recommendations?
Ive talked to a lot of class a drivers at various jobs. Staying close to home is low pay unless you are union. Expect pay to be low until you have years of experience and no points.

One word of advice...stay physically fit. Being sedetary for hours is very dangerous for your health and as a result also mentally.

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Going to be hard not to go OTR fresh out of school. That's all the big carriers are going to want you for with no experience. :(

(I have my CDL with all endorsements, got it 3 years ago, but don't drive truck. Long story.) I just do remember them pounding it in our heads that it's a real pisser to get used to and that 65% of the class wouldn't be driving truck 6 months later. I have no recommendations, but was going to start at Werner before the shit hit the fan. They seemed ok enough, I think a few more companies might be running automatics in their rigs now...

As someone said, watch your weight and exercise while on your breaks. Regardless of OTR, regional or local there's no a lot of movement and many people really start packing on the pounds, along with the lack of exercise not being good for the body.
 

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My Dad is a trucker and so are two of my friends. They say stay away from Stevens, JB Hunt and Swift. They will keep you out longer, SITTING, not making any money than some of the other companies. They all have their bad parts but hey tell me they are the worst. My friend Curt was working for Stevens and sat for 4 days waiting for a load, no miles being driven = no pay and he ended up being out 5 weeks, it wasn't the only time too. He works at another company now, I think Melton, and likes them alot more. There are good and bad opinions about them all, this is just what has been told to me
 

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You are going to have to be at least regional for a year before most decent locals will hire you. Regional/OTR's will drop you fairly quickly over accidents - on the road or running into something while in a yard or truckstop. It can happen very easily.

IIRC, you're from the K-C area? Who has hubs or operation centers in your area?

I started with Schneider. They were OK, kept me running pretty hard, usually. I'm too used to being home all the time and being out all week wore on me, especially during riding season. 34 hours at home per week doesn't give you much time...

You will want to stay away from east coast and FL, plenty of freight going there not so much getting you back out. One time a Schneider driver told me he was stuck in FL for over a week. He was in a truckstop with about a dozen and a half other Schneider drivers that couldn't get a load north or west. Anyone will tell you that you'll hear stories like this from any big company. The up side is that the big companies usually pull more freight when freight is slow.
 
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Shit, I'm on my phone and I can't see where you are at. One thing that you should do right now if have a plan with how you want your new career to progress. What kind of trucking do you want to do? If you are young enough or can handle putting the years, go to UPS with goal of becoming a feeder driver( hauling doubles and tripled)! Less than truckload freight, or LTL, is usually the best paying, you usually only run 5 days a week with weekends off and you do drop and hooks, and usually never have to touch freight. UPS ,imo, is the cream of the crop. However it will take you many years to work up to be a feeder driver. You'' have to start out as a package handler and spend a few years doing that unroll you can get on full time and drive the Vans. Then within a few years you are making top Union wages and you wait until you can bid on a feeder slot.

Old Dominion and Con-way are the only 2 LTL companies that I know if that will take and train new drivers. The others may, But I don't know. You will have to start out doing dockwork on an extra board until you are trained to drive and even them you will still be on an extra board until you have enough seniority to bid on a full time run. But IMO it is worth it. The most pay for the least amount of work and you are home everyday vs being OTR. Though some LTL line haul do have the option of running straight to another terminal instead of coming home. Then you bounce around for a few days,staying in hotels, making .50+ a mile. But that will be your choice I believe.

Out of the choices you listed, I think Maverick and Schneider are the best. Because with Maverick, you will be trained to run a flat bed. The work will be harder, but more interesting and more rewarding than regular dryvan or reefer. And after enough experience you can begin to haul oversize and over domentional freight. That among the most challenging but some of the most rewarding areas of your career you can get into. You will be gone a lot, but some of the stuff you can haul is just amazing and you will be well paid for it.

With Scheider, they will also train you to haul tankers. But I cannot remember if you must train and haul dryvan trailers first for a few months and THEN go for tanker training. With tankers, you are in an amazing playing field and deal customers that are actually happy to see you and you don't deal with docks or lumpers. You can haul fuel and be local. You could go haul crude oil or drive a water truck out in the oil fields and make a lot of money(will work and live like and animal) you could haul food grade products and never have to worry about haz mat or you haul everything including haz mat and just go apeshit lol.

I would also recommend going to a trucking forum like "The trucker Report" or "classADrivers" and check them out. The both have rookie sections the are quite extensive. Truckersreport is the largest one I believe and the one I like most.

I know I've been a Dick to you in the past and I apologize for it now. I'm overzealous and over react to just about anything Dog related. I was a jerk and I'm sorry.

I'm away from home and my PC until Thursday or Friday, so I can't really do any research for you right now but I would love to help you with any advice or research that you would like. I love trucks and trucking and I can talk about it all day. I'm actually attending orientation for my new Company now. Got my CDL in 99, but didn't seriously start driving until 04.

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I started hauling fuel back in 99. It will keep you really busy, but can be a real pain in the ass fighting cars trying to get a big truck in a station. I'd rather go back to hauling chemicals if I can find a local company again.
 

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You're pretty well going to have to go OTR for a year or two until you can find something more local.

Its a hard way to go at it, unfortunately. Lot of hours sitting around at truck stops, destinations, and waiting on the next assignment. My dad drove for Roehl for a while. They've got a pretty good company with a great record in safety, and the pay is decent.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Ive thought about trying to become a truck driver...

From what I hear swift will train you on the job for your cdl
Swift will take you to school, but it costs $3500 and you have a contract to work with them for so long. Break that contract and you still owe them the $3500, fail the tests you owe them $3500. Being in a contract, you're unable to quit basically. So you'll get the worst loads, least money making loads too.

Swift starts out at .25 cents/mile, where most companies start out at at least .32 cents per mile.

Shit, I'm on my phone and I can't see where you are at.
Even if you were able to see it, it wouldn't help. I live in Kansas City.

One thing that you should do right now if have a plan with how you want your new career to progress. What kind of trucking do you want to do?
I do not plan on being a OTR or even local driver for very long, maybe a year max. I plan to drive semi's for the purpose of having the experience. I am mainly getting my CDL for the local Electrical Union (Local 53). And the Railroad, two jobs I really do want. It is easier to get onto the railroad and Electrical Union if you have a CDL, and is required for a Electrical Union apprenticeship. Which I am still debating if I want to do a apprenticeship through the Electrical Union or go to college and get a bachlors degree...

If you are young enough or can handle putting the years, go to UPS with goal of becoming a feeder driver( hauling doubles and tripled)! Less than truckload freight, or LTL, is usually the best paying, you usually only run 5 days a week with weekends off and you do drop and hooks, and usually never have to touch freight. UPS ,imo, is the cream of the crop. However it will take you many years to work up to be a feeder driver. You'' have to start out as a package handler and spend a few years doing that unroll you can get on full time and drive the Vans. Then within a few years you are making top Union wages and you wait until you can bid on a feeder slot.
If I was smarter, I would have taken the job I was offered at UPS when I was 17 years old (22 now) and I would be that much closer to becoming a UPS driver. Man... weekends off, day runs, home nightly, good pay and benefits... Oh well. Haha


Out of the choices you listed, I think Maverick and Schneider are the best. Because with Maverick, you will be trained to run a flat bed. The work will be harder, but more interesting and more rewarding than regular dryvan or reefer. And after enough experience you can begin to haul oversize and over domentional freight. That among the most challenging but some of the most rewarding areas of your career you can get into. You will be gone a lot, but some of the stuff you can haul is just amazing and you will be well paid for it.
Right now I am leaning towards Maverick, for that reason. I don't know why, but flat bed just seems more "fun". I know it pays more, but it's also harder worker. Straps, blocks, tarps, and other items needed to secure items down.

A BNSF guy is coming in this Friday (I believe) and talking about "Operation Save Lives". Basically railroad safety and truck drivers. See if he has any advice on how to get hired, I currently have a few applications out for BNSF. One for track maintance in Springfield, MO. They sent me e-mail on Sunday saying I am still in the running. I really hope I get it. I'd much rather work for the railroad then being a OTR truck driver.


With Scheider, they will also train you to haul tankers. But I cannot remember if you must train and haul dryvan trailers first for a few months and THEN go for tanker training. With tankers, you are in an amazing playing field and deal customers that are actually happy to see you and you don't deal with docks or lumpers. You can haul fuel and be local. You could go haul crude oil or drive a water truck out in the oil fields and make a lot of money(will work and live like and animal) you could haul food grade products and never have to worry about haz mat or you haul everything including haz mat and just go apeshit lol.
Had a schneider guy come in today. They start a bit low on starting mileage too, .28 cents. The recrutier said you'll make (if you do well of course) .32 after a year (If I remember right). While Maverick flat beds start out at .34/mile. Schneider still didn't seem like a bad choice. Right now, I do not have to worry to much about money. Since I still live at home (trying to get out, but don't make enough money...) and no girl friend, kids, and just one dog.

I would also recommend going to a trucking forum like "The trucker Report" or "classADrivers" and check them out. The both have rookie sections the are quite extensive. Truckersreport is the largest one I believe and the one I like most.
I don't know why I haven't thought of a Truck driving forum till now... Ha Thanks!

I know I've been a Dick to you in the past and I apologize for it now. I'm overzealous and over react to just about anything Dog related. I was a jerk and I'm sorry.
It is quiet alright. I understand where you are coming from. And don't worry, he's still alive. He is laying on the carpet 10ft behind me right now. :D I changed my mine, he is actually doing a bit better but still has a little problem. I can get over it... I love my dog; Pepper dearly.


I'm away from home and my PC until Thursday or Friday, so I can't really do any research for you right now but I would love to help you with any advice or research that you would like. I love trucks and trucking and I can talk about it all day. I'm actually attending orientation for my new Company now. Got my CDL in 99, but didn't seriously start driving until 04.
Thank you for everything good sir. I'll probably shoot you a PM or two with-in the next week just asking a few questions if you do not mind. And thank you for everything again.
 

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the joke is in your hand
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join a trucker forum and you'll quickly find out you just wasted so much money on that class first of all. and the 2nd thing they'll tell you is never do the on the job training driving shit. you'll be paying them back so much of your paycheck you won't make shit and be living in your car. they'll keep you on the road for 8-15 days at a time too. plus like already mentioned you only make money while that truck is moving. the companies often make you sit at a location for a day waiting for a load to come in for you. I've seen a lot of those stories where the guy was broke and sleeping in a truck with no fuel in the dead of winter and no water and no money.

there were so many of these horror stories is why I decided not to pursue that kind of career. even though I know older dudes that do drive a truck making 60+k a year doing it. but the first 20 years of it they made just over min wage

you said you don't plan on being otr for long..lol good luck getting hired anywhere then. you'll have to start out doing it first with all of them since you don't have any experience. from what all those guys told me on the forums you'll be doing the otr thing for at least 2-3 years

then came all the horror stories about the truck enforcement guys and highway patrol just randomly pulling trucks over for inspections and you get the fine not the truck company because its your responsibility to check the truck out for issues and have them fixed.


they can keep their trucking jobs. plus all the older guys tell me it's not as fun as it sounds. it gets boring as fuck and the cops will pull you over for 2mph over 55 and you're facing a ticket and being fired.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
join a trucker forum and you'll quickly find out you just wasted so much money on that class first of all.
I do not believe I have. The community college is a non-for-profit organization and is a accredited college course (16 hours). A truck company is a for profit company, so they will charge you more. The normal costs for a trucking company (from what I have found) is $3,500. Most of the time, you must sign a contract with them forcing you to work with them for at least a year. During this year, you cannot quit. If you do, you owe them the $3,500. If you fail the test, you still owe them $3,500. And because you cannot reall quit, you'll get the worst loads too. Why give the loads that get the most money to the person who cannot quit? Why not give it to the person who does not have a contract?

We have had almost a dozen companies come by and talk to us students. Every company has a long history of hiring students right out of the course. Already half the class has had at least 1 (many have had 2) companies call or e-mail them about possible jobs. I have talked to Crete and Maverick myself.


2nd thing they'll tell you is never do the on the job training driving shit. you'll be paying them back so much of your paycheck you won't make shit and be living in your car.
Lets say you have a truck that's worth $100,000+. Would you allow a brand new, almost zero experience person who just got their CDL to jump right in your truck and take off? Don't you want to make sure their really know how to strap loads down, drive safely, shift and what not? No, I didn't think so. Plus insurance companies require them to do it.

About having to pay them back for the training, I do not know if that's true. Never thought of that, but I'll have to look into it.

And why would I be living in my car? There's a perfectly good bed in the semi itself... :-/

they'll keep you on the road for 8-15 days at a time too.
That's it? They'll only keep me out for 8-15 days? Where do I sign up? Shit... Most OTR (Over the road) drivers stay out AT LEAST two weeks. And home for a day and a half or less. You forgot to say that home time is not guaranteed, they could just make you sit in a truck stop for a weekend to do your 34 hour re-start.


plus like already mentioned you only make money while that truck is moving. the companies often make you sit at a location for a day waiting for a load to come in for you. I've seen a lot of those stories where the guy was broke and sleeping in a truck with no fuel in the dead of winter and no water and no money.
The average mileage a week for a truck driver is currently 2,200-2,900 miles a week. That's a not a whole lot of sitting around. Now if you get a load that needs to be taken to Flordia or California, yea you might be sitting for a while since nothing comes out of Flordia and the railroad takes care of much of the goods out of California.

The 2,200-2,900 miles a week isn't from companies either. That's from talking to people who are OTR drivers.



there were so many of these horror stories is why I decided not to pursue that kind of career. even though I know older dudes that do drive a truck making 60+k a year doing it. but the first 20 years of it they made just over min wage
In the first year, I'm estimating $30,000. Mininum wage is $14,000/year. These guys do not make minumum wage, no one would do the job. It's not worth it. It's not a high paying job, but after a few years. You'll be making $50,000/year. It depends on what you haul too. If you do a refrigerator van, you wont make that much, dry van makes a little more. Flat bed haulers make the most, because it's hard work. After 5 years of hauling falt bed, it's common to make at least .60 cents a mile. If you get into a smaller company, it's not that uncommon to be making $1000+ a week hauling iron and oversize loads.


you said you don't plan on being otr for long..lol good luck getting hired anywhere then. you'll have to start out doing it first with all of them since you don't have any experience. from what all those guys told me on the forums you'll be doing the otr thing for at least 2-3 years
I'd say a year is good. There are a lot of local companies in the Kansas City area that do short (300-400 mile) hauls. Hell, gas stations, grocery stores, beer vendors, water vendors, pop vendors, and god knows what else... I do not plan on a 9-5pm job. It'll probably be nights, including weekends. Not getting much home or social life time and pay will be crap, but that's ok with me. Plus, I do not really plan to be a truck driver very long anyways. If you would have read my post, the main reason I am getting a CDL is for the Railroad, Lineman Union, and Ironworkers. They love people with CDL's (Class A Air brakes too) and it'll be easier to get into these jobs with a CDL. Truck driver does not interest me at all, but doing it for a while just to say I have the experiance of driving large vehicles is why I am doing it.


then came all the horror stories about the truck enforcement guys and highway patrol just randomly pulling trucks over for inspections and you get the fine not the truck company because its your responsibility to check the truck out for issues and have them fixed.
The D.O.T is allowed to pull you over and inspect your vehicle at anytime they feel like. As long as you keep your truck up to code, you'll be fine. And it depends on the company you work for too. The large companies (Crete, Maverick, schneider, Werner and others) do not have a problem of D.O.T stopping their vehicles. The D.O.T has really started to push companies to make sure their vehicles are up to code. Most of their trucks are no older then 4 years old. They still do pull them over once and a while to make sure. And yes you do get a fine, but about the company not getting a fine. Well, that isn't true. The company does get a fine. If you screw up on your log books, you get a fine and so does the company. And it's not a slap on the wrist for the company and a jail term for the driver.

I am pulling a blank on what the law is called, but there was a law passed back in 2010 that put points on companies and drivers. It calculates driver and companies safety record and equitment. If you as a driver gain to many points, you'll be fired and fined. If the company gains to many points the company can and will be shut down by the D.O.T, which has happened many of times. This is why truck driving has changed a lot in the past 10 years and today is completely different from 15-20+ years ago.

The points stay with a driver for two years then they are cleared. A company has them for three years. Schneider for example, isn't allowed to even have an interview with someone who has over 10 points on their record. Companies take it very seriously because the D.O.T gives out huge fines to companies and can shut them down.

Cheating on the books will get you fired by a lot of truck companies because it will come back on the company too.


they can keep their trucking jobs. plus all the older guys tell me it's not as fun as it sounds. it gets boring as fuck and the cops will pull you over for 2mph over 55 and you're facing a ticket and being fired.
Driving down a interstate across the United States at 60-65mph is boring? You don't say...?

Damn....
 

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The CDL test isn't all that hard.

Schneider paid for my school - they contracted with the local technical college - started me @ $.28/mi. Home weekly. Anywhere from 1800-2700 miles per week, not much idle time usually. Usually had my next load on the computer 6 hours prior to making my delivery. Only had to stay with them for 6 months.

Some of the reason they ran the shit out of me was because they were paying me so little.

So glad to be in a day-cab. I'm too used to being home every night. And I'm making more now. Most of the locals (the better ones, at least) here wanted 1-2yrs experience and/or 150k miles.

Electrician is the kind of job that will always be in need and it pays well/good bennies.

UPS hire drivers directly but you need at least 5 years experience (accident-free) and a buttload of miles.
 
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US express has their own school that they send you to. You dont have to pay a dollar for it and they have a dorm you stay in while in school. You do have to sign a contract but do not have to pay money.... just dont leave till your contract is up.

If you already have your CDL then you will not have a contract but you will still have to go with a trainer for a while.... I think it is a month or something. Maybe less. Also depends on how the trainer thinks your doing. My trainer sat in the passanger seat for a week or so I think and moved us up to running team. Upped the miles and the pay for both of us.... but it all depends on how good you are and how comfortable the trainer is with you.

Remember that when you first start you will spend some money. Get a decent CB (first), fridge and microwave. These are some of the most important things to have on the truck so you dont have to eat out and spend all your money and also the CB will be a huge help at times. Other times it will just keep you awake.
 

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yeah that was something else they mentioned you will owe that company 2 times more than it costs you to take the school yourself. and the majority of them laughed at people doing the school thing. it's not a requirement to get a license to drive a truck. and it isn't really going to land you any jobs because they'll still make you run OTR to start out no matter what because you still have 0 experience. which is the name of the game in that line of work not your education. it's driving a truck, not brain surgery. all you have to do to pass the BMV test is study the book they give you at the BMV. so basically you're paying that school $3k to let you take the driver test in their truck and teach you something you can learn from a free book.

I know you think I'm full of it but I'm just repeating what I read. and I know someone that did it without the school or on the job training. (my stepfather).

seriously man I've had these trucking companies emailing me shit for several years. when you look at the details it's all a huge scam. it's a way for them to make extra money and get a sucker to run all the shit no one else wants to do. you will be working for about $10/hr and paying them back 60% of your paycheck for a year or more.

all I want for you is to look into all of it. I'm just throwing it out there so you can be aware of it. that's why I said join a truck driver forum and start asking/searching this for yourself.

and to be honest I'd be driving a truck today if I had access to one to take the test in. the guy my stepfather worked for passed away and my stepfather retired.
 

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I wouldnt suggest just going to take the test. You can rent a truck to do your CDL test in but unless you have a chance to practice you will fail. Driving a truck is not the same as driving a car. You have to swing wide... backing can be a little hard .... You have to double clutch to shift... you have to take your time comming to a stop with an empty load just as much as with a heavy load. There are lots of things that you have to learn to keep out of trouble. I finished top in my class but if I didnt take the class I would not have passed the driving test. You can read all the books you want but untill you try to double clutch or get the feel for how a specific truck shifts you will not do well. You might get turns and such from a good book .... backing you will not do so well. I got it quick but many people in my class failed backing every day for weeks before they got it right.... and even then I wouldnt want them backing if they where with me.
 

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I put in 6 yrs overall OTR since age 21. Started with Werner right out of a 3 week commercial driving school, because WE and JB Hunt were the only national OTR companies that would consider hiring someone that young right out of school. Spent about 10 weeks out from the time I left home in MS on a bus to Dallas for New Driver Orientation, 8 wks with a trainer, and a week to get me to a terminal for my own truck and get me a load that got me near home. Put in my year with them for the initial solo experience, then my friend (then gf...then fiance...now wife) helped get me a job with Transport America (based out of Eagan) which completed the reason I moved to MN. Worked there for a year and a half before getting tired of being gone 4 weeks at a time, being home for 2-3 days, and only having a 35k job to show for it. Got out of trucking for 2+ yrs to have a normal life (aka: the should be forgotten years).

Came back to trucking right as we were leaving from our year in Phoenix in '06....because basically I knew I could always make a decent living, or at least a supporting-role living, as my girl had been primary breadwinner and always kicked my butt by at least 10k every year. Initially I wanted to get back in the industry by joining Crete, because they were offering 41cpm with proper experience. And that blew away the .34cpm from TA and abysmal .28cpm @ Werner. They needed at least 6 months recent driving history since I'd been away from a semi for over 2 years, so before we moved back to MN I applied with Swift right there at corporate headquarters and was in my own truck after a week of refresher loads with a trainer. Put in roughly 7 months with Swift before applying to my original choice of Crete. Stayed with them for over 3 yrs and was based out of the Council Bluffs terminal and brought on at .42cpm. Pretty happy the entire time, made the most I'd ever made in my life as an OTR company driver, ALWAYS made sure I got home when I wanted, had great choice of loads because I'd help out dispatchers and take the ones other drivers refused (Canada, Los Angeles area, etc), so they'd reward me with random 2500-3000 mile runs.

I would probably still be with Crete today if my mother-in-law hadn't shown me a drivers wanted ad for a company based right here in town: McLane Distribution. I'd always passed by their DC (lived in Northfield for 3 yrs prior) and never thought twice about it...I'd even delivered there with Crete once and it took so long for them to unload me that I sent dispatch a Qualcomm note simply stating never send me here again.

Figured since my mom was intrigued and took the time to find the ad, I'd apply....because I'd always said if I could get a local/regional driving job that got me home more and paid nearly the same money, I'd make the switch in a heartbeat. Seemed like a literal Holy Grail, no way possible for that perfect job outside of being a FedEx or UPS delvery driver...but then I did a little internet research....

Starting pay: $65k+
Driving area: MN,ND,SD,WI,MI,IA,MO

Ok, so more money and less driving...I'm definitely interested. Best I'd ever done OTR was $50k.

I applied in the early spring of '11 and was pretty much hired on the spot, just had to wait a couple weeks for the background check to come thru...been with McLane ever since.

OTR is an incredible way to see the country. It can be a great profession for a single person with no real financial attachments (no mortgage or multi cars) because it does start wearing on you: "Why do I have a gf/house/fancy car/etc that I'm never home to see...". BUT, over the road trucking has given me tons of experiences. I've been to every state in the lower 48, played basketball at various YMCAs (couple in the Toronto/ Missisauga area as well) college athletic centers, and public rec centers in most of those states, been through each of the bordering provinces of Canada, and have been able to do some nice things I probably would have to take vacation to do if I were in another profession: been to WDW a couple times, stopped in Atlantic City and Las Vegas (LV multiple times), AMA Pro races @ Road Atlanta, played in a pickup game with OJ Mayo on the court @ 24 Hr Fitness in West Hollywood, been to Mt Rushmore, and have visited some of the big-name motorcycle gear store in person (STG north of Detroit, both Competition Accessories locations- south of Charlotte, NC and outside Dayton,OH, Iron Pony in Columbus, OH, and MotoLiberty in Dallas,TX). Biggest advice as an OTR is to limit your expenses if you can, but try to get out away from the truck stops and/or terminal to enjoy what you can so you don't become a mindless drone (aka: dumb trucker).

But I will tell you this. If you are in decent shape and have a McLane distribution center anywhere remotely close to you...go apply as soon as you can once you get some driving experience. It's TOUGH work, because in addition to the driving you also are responsible for unloading the ENTIRE trailer by hand. Be it by bumping a WalMart/Target/SAMs dock and palletizing the stops product to figuring out how you're going to pull a 53' trailer with sleeper cab truck into a gas station parking lot to unload dry, cooler, and freezer product down a 1.5' wide fame via 2wheel cart thru snow/ice/wind....and when running legally, that means you are unloading that 8,000lb Pilot truck stop all by yourself while your co-driver sleeps. Team driving took a bit to get used to after 6yrs solo....trusting them to not crash while you try to sleep.

I wish I would've known about this company when we first moved to Northfield 5yrs ago...heck, when I first moved to MN 8+ yrs ago....because getting my W2s from my first full year of being a bid driver at McLane nearly doubled my income from the best year I had as an OTR and being home way more as well.

If you have ANY questions about trucking, I'd be happy to try to answer.

-Christian
 
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