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Discussion Starter #1
Ok, flame away, I can take it, but hear me out first. I'm 30 yrs old, have plenty of experience riding dirt bikes, although I've never ridden a street bike. A couple years ago, I got the last bit of dirt out of my system with a Yamaha Banshee (I know we're not taking sport bike speeds, but that's a pretty fast quad, especially when you're sailing though the woods). I've owned and driven several Corvette's over the past 10 years (and not the dogs of the late 70's early 80's) and my license remains spotless. I had my first 'Vette for over two years before getting it up to 80mph. I don't speed, unless you consider keeping up with traffic these days speeding. Those who know me refer to me as "Granny" when I'm behind the wheel. In other words, I have a lot of self control, I take things slow and I'm certainly not out to prove anything to anyone.

So why the Hayabusa? It seems like the perfect fit - great touring bike but with more power and performance than the true touring bikes. And I like the style - I don't want to offend anyone, but all the other sport bikes have that "kid-ish" look, the Busa just has a more mature feel. I don't know anyone who rides sport bikes, so I'll either be riding alone or with guys in their 40's and 50's on cruisers (not exactly a crowd that invites the kind of competitive riding that invariable leads to trouble)

So will I still get into trouble on this thing? Taking the horsepower and torque out of the equation, is there still something about the Hayabusa that's not suitable for a first-time street bike? The weight? I'm pushing 200lbs myself, so I won't exactly be a rag doll hanging onto it. The handling? Sure, it's not as "flickable" as the smaller bikes, but I'm pretty sure it won't get into trouble taking turns at the same speeds as the guys on cruisers. I've read a lot of reviews that suggest it's a very well mannered bike if you can control the urge open it up.

Ok, let the flames begin...
 

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:eek: Man, you are asking for trouble with this bike. I drive a 600 R6, and that thing is nasty enough. Riding a sportbike is totally different that anything out there, I know. I too have done the dirtbike thing, my dad owns a yamaha and kawasaki dealership, so I had every yamaha and kawasaki dirtbike and quad out there. Seriously, it is not enough to say "I will be mature and not go really fast". If you hit a bump in the road and jerk the throttle, man you are gonna fly faster then you ever have. There is little margine for error as compared on a smaller bike.

You need to build up experience that will teach you how to handle dangerous situations on the road, and the best way to learn is on a small starter bike where if you make a mistake you won't fly 150m/hr into another vehicle or something. Ride safe man.
 

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There is more to riding a street bike than "controlling yourself" you have to understand that a bike that big, that powerful, and that heavy, you are asking for trouble. One thing I don't understand after reading your full post is why you posted this in the first place. Don't get me wrong, I'm glad you asked, but the thing is, from reading your post you sound fairly set in the idea of getting a Busa, all you did in your thread is try to justify the purchase. Now read this next line very carefully:

People only try to justify decisions when they KNOW they are making a mistake.

You are going to get what you want no matter what I say or anyone else on this board says. We could all flame you and yell at you, but it's not going to matter, you are still getting the Busa.

So just ride safe, pay attention, and most importantly take the MSF course (the skills it teaches you will save your life someday and it's also a nice discount on Insurance).

Jason
 

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Discussion Starter #5
>People only try to justify decisions when they
>KNOW they are making a mistake.

Point well taken.

Thanks for the input. I haven't made up my mind yet, although I would be lying to say I'm not leaning towards the Hayabusa. At the same time, I'd also be lying to deny that the feedback I've gotten here and elsewhere does have me looking at other options. I just have a problem paying 8 to 9 grand for a 6oo to 700 cc bike, when the Busa is "only" a few grand more. I'm keeping an eye on the local paper for used bikes in the 600 to 700 cc range, but everything newer with low miles is only about a grand below buying something new. Regardless of what I buy, I'll definitely be taking the safety course.

With all the off-road riding I've done, I know how to hold a bike in a manner that won't cause me to gun it if I hit a bump (a skill definitely learned through experience ;c). And I do have a very healthy respect for power, not least of which was taught by the death of a relative on an R1 a few years back.

Can the Hayabusa be ridden conservatively, or does it simply have so much power that doing so is extremely difficult without experience? How, if at all, does handling the weight compare to a similar weight cruiser? Is any bike of similar weight unsuitable for a 1st bike?

I live in a very rural area, full of lazy country roads and wouldn't consider taking any sport bike on the interstates for quite some time. Here's probably a dumb question - since these bikes (1000+ cc) are apparently speed limited to something like 189, is there a way to change that to a lower speed? Clearly there's a way to disable it altogether, judging by some of the videos I've downloaded...

Thanks again for the input.
 

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The only speed control device you need is your right wrist. The Hayabusa can be ridden at sane speeds, but you'd be amazed how fast you will hit 100mph on that bike without even knowing it. So like I said, you are going to get what you want in the end, all we can do is offer advice. I'd suggest if you are looking for a bike with alot of power try the new GSXR750, I've been reading nothing but good reviews on it. You'd probably have to buy new since it's new for 2004, but that's up to you. But as always my advice is to start small and take the MSF course. 600cc sport bikes nowadays will outrun litrebikes of 10 years ago so try to ride a few of the bikes you are looking at.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
>but you'd be amazed how fast you will hit 100mph
>on that bike without even knowing it

And from the videos I've seen, it won't really stop pulling until it approaches 200...

Ok, assuming a Hayabusa purchase sometime in the future, what would be the path there with the fewest stops? If I buy and ride a 600cc bike for a year or so will it still be crazy to jump to the Busa after that? Or would it be wise then to go to a 1000cc bike in between. Is a 750 even too much for a first road bike? Any experience/thoughts/info on the Kawasaki ZX6R's The GSXR750 is nice, but I wish it was available with a less flashy paint job...

See, you didn't think it would happen, but you're talking me out of a Busa... ;c)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I have a totally baseless dislike of Hondas! I don't know why, I can't explain it, but I've just never liked them. If I was going to buy anything other than the Hayabusa, it'd be a ZX6R or a GSXR-600. The GSXR-750 looks like a great bike, but at only a grand less than the Hayabusa...
 

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Dude go into the new rider forume and read everthing you can.

Even the other bikes you want to start street on are not good.
 

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The new litrebikes are just as fast as the new Busa for the most part, at least from what I've read. Haven't had a chance to ride any of the new litres. So those aren't going to be any more forgiving than the Busa, and they will be substantially less comfortable. Like Cajun said. check out the new rider forum, follow some of the links in the sticky's and read up.
 

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Bro,

You're going to get what u want( I did), so take the beginner MSF course. Practice with an experienced rider, then take the intermediate MSF course with your own bike. Practice with an experienced rider. Be safe, try not to do anything stupid and remember any bike can kill you. :lol
 

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Congrats on getting the Busa. I feel more comfortable with a 30 year old newbie on a Busa than I do with an 18 year old newbie on one.
 

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I have rode the Busa and have found it to be very tame until you open it up and it's an all new beast. Get what you will be happy with but be carefull.
 

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With all the replys, do any of you own a Busa?
I am no way trying to start anything but I own and ride one everyday..2004 Busa, 1800 miles and it is only 6 weeks old. I have learned that no other bike gets you ready for this bike. Only experience and self control can be any way you will ride one. It is the most docile bike I have ever ridden in normal city traffic, doesnt care what gear you are in, it just goes with every twist of the throttle. I ride mine 85 miles on Florida Turnpike each way when I ride it to work, it loves anything over 80 or anything under 80. It is just stable and smooth, very comfortable and just a nice long riding experience. BUT dont ever think you are the master, one little pothole you dont see, a little twist on the thottle you didnt expect this bike will eject you right off of it, it will stand up very easy or spin the back tire out from under you, quicker then you can stop it. I have ridden all the new R-1s, cbr 954s, ZX6, ZX9, and a lot of 600ss type bikes, and the occaisional RC51(my next choice) out of all of them the busa will out power and brute force by them except going into the twisties, it isnt as flickable but it handles alot nicer then everyone thinks, although a half way good rider could probably pass me in the twisties very easy, but with the power it has it power wheelies out of curves and spins the back tire out at other times....So all I am saying is get what you want, take all the safty courses you can, do some track days on your bike, and in parting the only way to get experience is to ride...Just get something and ride...PEACE

ERIC
RUSSO-RACING
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thanks for all the replies everyone, and especially Eric. Your first-hand experience and feedback is extremely valuable. At this point, I'm still no closer to making a decision, but I'm certainly better informed. I'll probably take the MSF basic course within a few weeks, and if I do end up with a Hayabusa, I'll definitely take the intermediate course and will hold myself to a severely strict set of riding rules for quite some time. Actually, I'll hold myself to the same set of rules regardless of what I end up with. I'm not looking to get myself killed, don't really care to go all that fast. I'm Pretty sure I won't end up winning any Darwin awards.... riding at least, scuba diving is another matter entirely ;c)
 

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User Name said:
Ok, flame away, I can take it, but hear me out first. I'm 30 yrs old, have plenty of experience riding dirt bikes, although I've never ridden a street bike. A couple years ago, I got the last bit of dirt out of my system with a Yamaha Banshee (I know we're not taking sport bike speeds, but that's a pretty fast quad, especially when you're sailing though the woods). I've owned and driven several Corvette's over the past 10 years (and not the dogs of the late 70's early 80's) and my license remains spotless. I had my first 'Vette for over two years before getting it up to 80mph. I don't speed, unless you consider keeping up with traffic these days speeding. Those who know me refer to me as "Granny" when I'm behind the wheel. In other words, I have a lot of self control, I take things slow and I'm certainly not out to prove anything to anyone.

So why the Hayabusa? It seems like the perfect fit - great touring bike but with more power and performance than the true touring bikes. And I like the style - I don't want to offend anyone, but all the other sport bikes have that "kid-ish" look, the Busa just has a more mature feel. I don't know anyone who rides sport bikes, so I'll either be riding alone or with guys in their 40's and 50's on cruisers (not exactly a crowd that invites the kind of competitive riding that invariable leads to trouble)

So will I still get into trouble on this thing? Taking the horsepower and torque out of the equation, is there still something about the Hayabusa that's not suitable for a first-time street bike? The weight? I'm pushing 200lbs myself, so I won't exactly be a rag doll hanging onto it. The handling? Sure, it's not as "flickable" as the smaller bikes, but I'm pretty sure it won't get into trouble taking turns at the same speeds as the guys on cruisers. I've read a lot of reviews that suggest it's a very well mannered bike if you can control the urge open it up.

Ok, let the flames begin...
I started riding when I was 7 I'm now 40. I have riden in the dirt for most of my early years up to early 20s. I started on street at 17, I got my Hayabusa when I was 40. I had riden several street bikes over the last 12yrs in california traffic. You must realize the bike is very fast and with no on the street experience that combination can be deadly. But for any bike you get time on the bike is the most important thing to surviving. Its just a bit easier to survive when you can out ride the bike soon after getting the bike. The Hayabusa took ME a while to get to the over riding part so I suggest you think very carefully before putting 11k into a new bike.
 

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User Name,

What ever you do, listen to ERIC8650. The people who say you'll kill yourself are the ones that probably feel a Busa is too much bike for them. I have a 2003 Busa and absolutely love it and I'm a twisties type of guy.
 

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Is there ever a point to these type of Topics, other than the same 'ol opinionated debate? :confused:

*analogy*
Who gives a new driver the license to operate a semi-truck loaded with liquid Oxygen? :answer: No one, you must operate a passenger vehicle for a certain amount of time prior to getting your CDL and/or hazmat endorsement.

Dirt is not =/ or >/ Street riding. The two are completely different and have totally different hazards. Nor does driving a four-wheeled mode of transportation have ANYTHING to do with a street-based motorcycle. As the old saying goes...'learn to walk before you run'.

Good luck with your decision. *signing off*
 
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