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In short, DMG has pushed all the factory support out and they are trying to NASCARize motorcycle racing.
 

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In short, DMG has pushed all the factory support out and they are trying to NASCARize motorcycle racing.
The rolling starts in the Daytona class were pretty gay, but overall I thought the races were pretty fun to watch, some real good battles with guys like Martin Cardenas, Jason DiSalvo, and Danny Eslick.

The American Superbike series was pretty lame though, I hate watching Mat Mladin destroy everyone.
 

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The rolling starts in the Daytona class were pretty gay, but overall I thought the races were pretty fun to watch, some real good battles with guys like Martin Cardenas, Jason DiSalvo, and Danny Eslick.

The American Superbike series was pretty lame though, I hate watching Mat Mladin destroy everyone.
The whole safety car/safety bike idea is pretty lame too.
 

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Yeah it really seems like the stop AMA unnecessarily for minor crashes that in WSBK or MotoGP would not have any effect on the rest of the grid.
 

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having the Buell in daytona sportbike offended a lot of people too. I lke Ben Spies' comment about the bike making up 8-10 bike lengths on a straight just isnt right, especially the main way to win races is go Fastest in the Fast parts.
 

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I have very mixed emotions about the AMA/DMG. I like the fact that AMA roadracing is being rum by a group that knows how to market racing and get it on TV. The success of NASCAR shows that these guys know what they are doing regarding the media.

The problem is they don't know anything about motorcycle racing. Instead of leaving most of the rules as they were or even moving to rules even closer to those of WSBK, AMA/DMG created a convoluted series that has no relevance in the world theatre.

Televised racing should be about seeing the best riders on the best bikes. I don't want to watch privateers on basically stock bikes roll around the track.

The other big problem with AMA/DMG is the fact that the rules don't create a good environment for riders to progress to WSBK or MotoGP (I think we can agree that Ben Spies is something special).

That said, I'll still watch any AMA race (and WSBK and MotoGP) I can find on TV. I just love road racing.
 

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hey privateers get my attention even more. these are the guys that leave their jobs to travel to the race and battle it out with teams with 70 times the budget.
it's still anyones sport where anyone can come race.

not like it is with sbk and motogp where you need at least a few million dollars to race.
 

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hey privateers get my attention even more. these are the guys that leave their jobs to travel to the race and battle it out with teams with 70 times the budget.
it's still anyones sport where anyone can come race.

not like it is with sbk and motogp where you need at least a few million dollars to race.


i'm on board with this one but what about smaller circuits? WERA or CCS? How about the kids also who were riding in the Redbull Rookie's Cup and now are backed by teams that appear to have some deep pockets. they're being molded to head over seas, i'm sure of it.. why would they want to stay in the states with such a poor motorcycle racing system?!I think the AMA really has made some poor decisions as mentioned in some previous posts and threads.. i'm interested to see where this series heads in the next 3 years or so considering the major changes they've already made i'm sure there's more on the way.
 

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To understand the DMG approach to racing, you have to understand the NASCAR approach to racing. The briefest possible summary: Competition is bad. It is undesirable in racing because there are winners and losers.

As in most of life, the outcome of a race is the sum of many, many micro-factors. On a given day, car, driver, strategy, and luck will favor one or a few teams, and they will shit on others. These differences usually reveal themselves well before the checkers fly, and it becomes clear who the racing gods favor that day. Racers themselves understand this and use the motivation of a bad day to turn things around. A win after a long season (or career!) of learning, developing, and working hard to improve finishing position is sweet indeed. Some say that kind of victory is the best reward racing has to offer.

But not everyone sees it that way. Spectators (though not fans) don't want to see a "parade" where the race is pretty much decided halfway through. Nor do TV syndicators, who want to keep eyeballs glued to the screen from beginning to end. Nor do team sponsors who might find themselves out of the limelight too often to justify the expense. So something must be done about this bloody competition that reveals who rules and who drools.

What is needed is randomness: a bunch of cars circling the track without that pesky component of human skill stratifying the field. Cars must be as equal as possible. Eliminate the possibility of engineering a better machine--even in details as seemingly minor as spring rates and differential ratios. Where technical skill can be applied, the ugly possibility of inequality looms.

Reduce the contribution of driver skill. The combination of cars with limited performance and tracks that don't seriously test their acceleration, deceleration, and cornering negates a driver's ability at the edge of the performance envelope. Less skill required, more randomness.

Add the wildcard factor of pit stops. A random element unrelated to actual racing, they tend to shuffle the running order and relieve boredom.

Finally, when all else fails, throw the yellow for phantom "debris". In spite of all the anticompetitive rules, sometimes it all comes together for one or two teams, and they run away from the field. That will not be permitted. Throw the caution. Pack them up again. Keep as many as possible on the lead lap. Force pit stops that just might go wrong for the leaders. Give other teams a chance to make car adjustments. Re-equalize the field.

After hours of random pulling ahead, falling behind, and lead-swapping, it comes down to a photo finish, and someone ekes out a millisecond win. And the TV guy says: "Wow! What a race! After 500 miles of intense competition, the margin of victory is half a fender!" In fact, there was very little competitive about it. The finish was the product of 50 years of experience in suppressing competition for 499 miles, and then letting it all hang out for the final 30 seconds.


I think that's the vision DMG has for US motorcycle racing. I doubt they can pull it off. They'll try real hard to force motorcycles into the same mold and ruin the sport in the process.
 

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Rob Dingman is an idiot for giving the series away.

Roger Edmonson et. al. are idiots for running the series into the ground.

The damage is done, it may be too late. Some of the b***** name support teams are either not racing this year or having a damned hard time coming up with the sponsor dollars necessary to run.

The series had problems, the biggest being the amount of say the factories had in rule making. What DMG did was way overboard. Now they have the opposite problem. They have pissed off the factories so much that most of their dollars are gone - not only for race teams, but for promoters too. Doing this when the economy was tanking didn't help, it just made the decision by the factories to scale back much easier.

Still, this was all discussed at length a year and a half ago...right JK?
 

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The success of NASCAR shows that these guys know what they are doing regarding the media.
No there success is based off of one man figuring out how to market himself to the public and NASCAR benefitted from it. You also had the whole indy car fallout about the same time NASCAR made its ride from redneck to the all american motorsport. NASCAR has been lucky to be where they are and will probably stay there due to a lack of decent competition but I was not at all impressed with what had been done with the AMA stuff I saw.
 

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Still, this was all discussed at length a year and a half ago...right JK?
Yeah, my head is still hurting from that.

Here's a link for those wanting to see some back story on this topic.
http://www.sportbikes.net/forums/general-sportbikes/388262-dmg-ama-edmondson-daytona-motorsports-group-discussion-thread.html

The fact is a lot of people thought that DMG would be a good thing for AMA racing because it would bring a lot of NASCAR media savvy people into the sport. A lot of NASCAR marketing exposure and b***** purse money. Well, none of that happened or was ever intended to happen.

TV coverage, which was already lacking before DMG, nosedived completely with DMG's totally inept TV package with SPEED last year. Televised race coverage was sometimes delayed over two and a half weeks. The next round of racing had already been run!

Marketing and purse money was almost non-existent. There was no marketing at all the first half of the season. Several fees charged to the promoters, tracks and racers, actually increased. None of the good qualities of NASCARization of the sport materialized and most of the bad qualities did. The involvement of the France family and NASCAR never existed once the lights went out at Daytona. And they diluted the Daytona 200 years ago. Roger Edmonson and his cronies alone ran the series into the ground from there. And the proof is in they are all now gone. But so is any credibility the series had left.

Superbike series racing was created on American soil. SBK and all other Superbikes series around the world were modeled after it. Now AMA/DMG have made a mockery of American Superbike racing.
 

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To understand the DMG approach to racing, you have to understand the NASCAR approach to racing. The briefest possible summary: Competition is bad. It is undesirable in racing because there are winners and losers.

As in most of life, the outcome of a race is the sum of many, many micro-factors. On a given day, car, driver, strategy, and luck will favor one or a few teams, and they will shit on others. These differences usually reveal themselves well before the checkers fly, and it becomes clear who the racing gods favor that day. Racers themselves understand this and use the motivation of a bad day to turn things around. A win after a long season (or career!) of learning, developing, and working hard to improve finishing position is sweet indeed. Some say that kind of victory is the best reward racing has to offer.

But not everyone sees it that way. Spectators (though not fans) don't want to see a "parade" where the race is pretty much decided halfway through. Nor do TV syndicators, who want to keep eyeballs glued to the screen from beginning to end. Nor do team sponsors who might find themselves out of the limelight too often to justify the expense. So something must be done about this bloody competition that reveals who rules and who drools.

What is needed is randomness: a bunch of cars circling the track without that pesky component of human skill stratifying the field. Cars must be as equal as possible. Eliminate the possibility of engineering a better machine--even in details as seemingly minor as spring rates and differential ratios. Where technical skill can be applied, the ugly possibility of inequality looms.

Reduce the contribution of driver skill. The combination of cars with limited performance and tracks that don't seriously test their acceleration, deceleration, and cornering negates a driver's ability at the edge of the performance envelope. Less skill required, more randomness.

Add the wildcard factor of pit stops. A random element unrelated to actual racing, they tend to shuffle the running order and relieve boredom.

Finally, when all else fails, throw the yellow for phantom "debris". In spite of all the anticompetitive rules, sometimes it all comes together for one or two teams, and they run away from the field. That will not be permitted. Throw the caution. Pack them up again. Keep as many as possible on the lead lap. Force pit stops that just might go wrong for the leaders. Give other teams a chance to make car adjustments. Re-equalize the field.

After hours of random pulling ahead, falling behind, and lead-swapping, it comes down to a photo finish, and someone ekes out a millisecond win. And the TV guy says: "Wow! What a race! After 500 miles of intense competition, the margin of victory is half a fender!" In fact, there was very little competitive about it. The finish was the product of 50 years of experience in suppressing competition for 499 miles, and then letting it all hang out for the final 30 seconds.


I think that's the vision DMG has for US motorcycle racing. I doubt they can pull it off. They'll try real hard to force motorcycles into the same mold and ruin the sport in the process.
...Wow...a hell of a post...
 
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