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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, it's time to refresh the forks. New seals, bushings, and probably steering bearings. I've heard several people say All Balls is the good shit when it comes to steering bearings. What about seals and bushings? Normally I prefer OEM but one triumph dust seal is $13 and an All Balls kit with 2 dust seals and 2 fork seals is $17. Does anyone have any experience with aftermarket fork seals and bushings?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks, ped.

Since I'm pretty light, probably 140 lbs with gear, do you think I need different springs? I'm not planning to do a whole lot of track days. Just back roads and what not. I've never been unhappy with how the bike handles, actually I think it's great. I just don't know if there is more to be had. I came from an EX500, so almost anything is a drastic upgrade.
 

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After Me Lucky Charms
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Don't forget fork fluid. And if you are willing to spend some money (about $200), re valve them.

A valve shim kit for my Daytona is $179 from racetech.
 

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no springs are fine. just make sure you clean the carts out well cause that's where the gunk actually builds up. Put good fluid back in.....I like maxima
 

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Mexican Hard Shell Taco
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Everybody hates aftermarket fork seals, but the two times I've used All Balls seal kits they have worked just fine.

Last time I used them it was for my SV1000S, a rock or something dinged/scratched one one fork and it was pissing fluid! As you've found out, the OEM stuff is WAY more expensive than the all balls seal kit, but after I had installed All Balls fork seals on my old Katana 750, and never had trouble with it, I decided to get one for the SV1K. $24 for the seals and dust covers, several warnings that they would fail within 6 months...

I just looked for the invoice on my e-mail, that was in July 2012. I no longer own the bike, but as I sold it to a friend, I know how it's doing and the forks are just fine.

When you disassemble the forks, take a look at the stuff that is in there and then look at fresh fluid out of the bottle. Now imagine how the stuff in the rear shock must be like, keep in mind that rear shocks also wear out and it will probably be more noticeable once you've freshened up the front end.
 

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Turbo nerd.
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Thanks, ped.

Since I'm pretty light, probably 140 lbs with gear, do you think I need different springs? I'm not planning to do a whole lot of track days. Just back roads and what not. I've never been unhappy with how the bike handles, actually I think it's great. I just don't know if there is more to be had. I came from an EX500, so almost anything is a drastic upgrade.
Your bike is sprung for a 160 pound rider, so stock is fine, however, those springs are OLD and likely well below their new rating. You can get the set for a relatively cheap, and if you are getting the seals and bushings done its a no brainer.

...+1 on the Allballs bushings and OEM seals.
 

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the joke is in your hand
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I put all balls seals in my forks the last time because the yamaha seals leaked. the all balls seals use 2 springs instead of 1 like the oem.
been 2 years and still no signs of leaks.
I will buy again.

as for the bushings, I'd rather stick to yamaha's. but hey, the all balls could be better than triumph's

I do highly recommend you grease the fork seals with grease instead of oil. either racetech super slick seal grease or noleen sf-3(a lot of RC racers use this on their car's shock seals).
and a fork seal bullet from motion pro. it will keep the seal protected as you slide over the top of the shaft. "giggity"

dude if you are in covington ky, me and ped live right across the river in cincy. you could borrow my fork tools. I have a seal driver, a fork bullet, the fork oil level tool, and seal grease
 
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