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Haha, comment 3 is funny. But honestly, I do like the idea. I wonder how well it would hold up to track conditions though. I'd be a little skeptical putting a new helmet to that test versus something I already know works pretty damn well.
 

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It depends on what you are protecting from/for.

The elastomeric shock absorbing system CAN'T absorb as much energy as the typical EPS, in the same space, laws of physics

However, this does have some interesting aspects to it, but I'd really wonder about size and weight trying to incorporate all of it

Now, for lesser impacts, it can be tuned for better absorption, but so could EPS, if you wanted. You could also change from EPS to a reusable foam, such as polyethylene, polyurethane or others.

Traditional EPS liners are omni-directional by their very nature, more than the columns of elastomers could ever be.


It's an interesting design, size and weight would be a big concern, and overall shock absorption capability
 

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A guy on a scruffy bike
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I love the idea. If/when they make a streetbike helmet, I will take a serious look at it.

PhilB
 

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For the record, I used an elastomeric isolation system for a very fragile, 1,200 lb, $10,000,000 satellite, but I didn't have size and weight limitations, and it needed to be reusable.

Again, you design the system for a specific set of goals and needs.

It's interesting, I could see it more suitable for offroading, where the speeds are lower and the impact surfaces softer
 

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After Me Lucky Charms
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It depends on what you are protecting from/for.

The elastomeric shock absorbing system CAN'T absorb as much energy as the typical EPS, in the same space, laws of physics

However, this does have some interesting aspects to it, but I'd really wonder about size and weight trying to incorporate all of it

Now, for lesser impacts, it can be tuned for better absorption, but so could EPS, if you wanted. You could also change from EPS to a reusable foam, such as polyethylene, polyurethane or others.

Traditional EPS liners are omni-directional by their very nature, more than the columns of elastomers could ever be.


It's an interesting design, size and weight would be a big concern, and overall shock absorption capability
From reading the comments, I found this in comment #14

It’s light: 6D says it weighs around 1,490 grams (around 3.3 pounds); for comparison, Shoei’s $614 VFX-W weighs 1,522 grams.
 

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the joke is in your hand
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lets hope the helmet materials are on par with arai, shoei etc. then it would be worth looking into.

I've been down that road wearing cheap shit from hjc, bieffe etc. they're terrible helmets.
 

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It depends on what you are protecting from/for.

The elastomeric shock absorbing system CAN'T absorb as much energy as the typical EPS, in the same space, laws of physics

However, this does have some interesting aspects to it, but I'd really wonder about size and weight trying to incorporate all of it

Now, for lesser impacts, it can be tuned for better absorption, but so could EPS, if you wanted. You could also change from EPS to a reusable foam, such as polyethylene, polyurethane or others.

Traditional EPS liners are omni-directional by their very nature, more than the columns of elastomers could ever be.


It's an interesting design, size and weight would be a big concern, and overall shock absorption capability
You are saying a lot of things right. For instance, the elastometers are mounted on metal plates, and the plates consume some of the available space. A "perfectly tuned" EPS liner thus has more space to decelerate the head than a "perfectly tuned" elastometer setup. Thus, the EPS liner can decelerate more gently than the elastometers. This is simple physics indeed. Yes, you can always make the elastometer helmet a touch b*****, but then you can make the EPS helmet that same size and always have that little advantage.

That said, it should be much more easy to tune elastometers than EPS liners. With the elastometers, you just adjust the thickness to adjust their reaction shear and compression, and that reaction force will not be a constant, but will vary with the forces. By shaping the columns into hourglass shapes, you can make the deceleration curve look any way you think best. With EPS, you can only adjust the density and crush threshold, and those things interact. EPS has a non-linear response that you can't really tune beyond that. So even with several layers of differing density, EPS will be pretty difficult to tune.

As an additional point, the elastometers allow the helmet to rotate around the wearer's head slightly. This damps the rotational forces on the head, and EPS does little or nothing for that. In this sense, I disagree that EPS is omnidirectional.

I'm very interested in this new design, and think it will be better in many ways. The thinner they can make the mounting plates, the better the design will be.

- John
 

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Note, y'all, that this helmet does not just use the suspension units without EPS. Primary impact absorption is still provided by EPS just like a normal helmet. The difference is that instead of one thick EPS layer, it has 2 EPS layers about half as thick, with the suspension units in between them, in about a 1/4" gap.

PhilB
 

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Note, y'all, that this helmet does not just use the suspension units without EPS. Primary impact absorption is still provided by EPS just like a normal helmet. The difference is that instead of one thick EPS layer, it has 2 EPS layers about half as thick, with the suspension units in between them, in about a 1/4" gap.

PhilB
Well then the physics of the helmet are no longer simple, are they?

- John
 

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Well then the physics of the helmet are no longer simple, are they?

- John
Sure it's a bit more complicated. It also should work better for a wider variety of impacts. My comment wasn't about that; it was just informational in that it sounded like some of the commenters thought the elastomer units provided the main impact protection, which isn't the case.

PhilB
 

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It would be simpler to layer foams to cover a broader range of conditions. Put an open cell foam layer in that would provide a softer ride for lower impacts, when that is overwhelmed and bottoms out, the EPS would take over

again, the problem is size - and size then equals weight
 

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It would be simpler to layer foams to cover a broader range of conditions. Put an open cell foam layer in that would provide a softer ride for lower impacts, when that is overwhelmed and bottoms out, the EPS would take over

again, the problem is size - and size then equals weight
Simpler, yes, but this does more than that; the suspension layer allow for lateral movement as well, thus reducing rotational injuries, which is a significant benefit.

There was a British company working on an idea to do the same (reduce rotational injuries) by developing a helmet that had a "scalp", or elactic outer skin. The company was called Phillips, and I think their design is sold in the U.K. by Laser, but it isn't available in the U.S.

PhilB
 

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Silent pipes take lives
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Both this and traditional helmets work on the same principle: Allowing your head to decrease velocity over a longer distance and therefore minimizing peak acceleration.

Or, to put it another way, 1" is 1". No matter how advanced your helmet's system or materials, there is a minimum acceleration value which a brain will encounter for any given speed over that distance.

Now other effects, as have already been pointed out, may be beneficial. But the root acceleration issue really can't be improved upon significantly.
 
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