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I just tried this.

If you're not mechanically inclined, or tend to be ham-fisted [Like I am :rolleyes ], Better to just let the Yamaha mechanics deal w. this.

Thought I'd try to save a $ and learn something at the same time. Oh well:

Here are some observations and questions.

1. As per FZ6 Owner's Manual: Axle Nut s/b tightened (post slack adjustment) To: 87 Ft-Lbs Torque. Well, my torque wrench shows torque applied both when you loosten and tighten. Torque to loosten the dealer-set Axle Nut was well over 115 Ft-Lbs... ?

So either they over torqued it @ 600mi service or the setting they give in the Manual is under-stated... ?

2. Torque setting for the Tensioning Lock Nut: 11 Ft-Lbs... How is it even possible to get a torque wrench onto a lock nut that small, esp. w. Slack Adj. Nut right in front of it?. I just tried to go by feel, based upon the amount of pressure to loosten it in the first place.

Next came the battle: How much are you supposed to loosten the Axle Nut before you attempt to adjust chain slack? I loostened it maybe two or three full revolutions, but I think that was too much.

As far as chain slack measurement goes: Found it pretty difficult to measure that from instructions in the owner's manual, but did my best. What I don't understand is how much pressure we're supposed to apply to the chain to take the slack measurement. If I use very light finger pressure that gave a slack measurement of between 1" and 1.5" upward (after I tightened it) measuring by radial center of a given chain link. If I applied more pressure, then I could easily pin the chain against the bottom of the swing-arm, so I'm confused as to whether I'm over or under factory recommended chain slack setting at this point.

BTW: Manual says slack measurement should be between 1.77" & 2.17".

It doesn't state if that is when measuring outsides of a given chain link or a single center of a link.

Finally, getting the axle allignment correct again was a real bit-CH. Maybe because I loostened the axle nut too much to begin with?

Trying to use those axle allignment hash marks is tough because the Axle Nut on the left is a different diameter from the one on the right. Also the washer underneath the Axle Nut can move fwd or backward a bit, so it cannot be relied upon to take the measurement either. In the end, I counted the number of threads exposed on the tensioning bolts, aft of the tension lock nut.

Turns out that I needed a big crescent wrench on the Right Side Axle Nut while tightening down the Left Side, otherwise the whole axle turned with the torque applied from the left.

Anyway, I'm still going to bring it to the Yamaha dealer to check the chain slack and axle allignment before any long rides. Looking back on this, I think I'll prob. bring it in to have the slack adjusted from now on, or find a local mechanic to show me the right procedure before re-attempting this.

Having a Cycle Jack, the proper tools and being in a garage rather than your apartment complex parking lot in 90 Deg. F. heat (I'm a renter...) would make this adjustment a ton easier to do.

Those are my observations. Sorry if this was too long-winded.
 

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If you take it to a dealer, they will likely eyeball the hash marks, kick the chain once, and charge you $50.
 

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Respect My Authority!
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You can do this. I experienced the same types of questions the first time as well but it became much easier the second time. By the way I have only had to tighten the chain twice in 5,000 miles. Save your money and get it done. Search the forum if you haven't already for this.
 

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Super Nibber
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Looks like your asking all the right questions...there is a sweet spot between too loose and too tight: I found it by listening to the chain at about 30 mph. After tightening it within spec, it was still too tight and made alot of noise. Then back off just a tad and you've got it(still within spec). You will notice the difference in sound.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
FZ6 said:
Looks like your asking all the right questions...
Hey, thanks for the feedback!. I had time to take her out for a test-ride. Felt great. In fact, some of those throttle yips she had when leaving from a full stop or chain-lash when rolling off the throttle, went away. Made a couple runs up to 90mph and hit some twisties. Checked the hash marks, tension bolts afterwards. All-Good. Based on this ride, perhaps I'll just keep 'er set where she's at and save the $50.

BTW: 1300 miles today, so 700 since service, but pushed 'er pretty hard in canyons last 300 since 1000 mile mark. The FZ6's motor just sings above 8,000. Likin' it. Prob. going to be even sweeter if/when she's got some Arrow Cans on.
 

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It took me at least 3 hours and about 6 trips around my subdivision to get the tension correct. There seems to be a fine line between too loose and too tight.
 

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FZ6nIT, just remember 1 thing. The care and diligence you exercise in trying to adjust your chain to the optimum setting, is not at the same level as the care and diligence the dealer will exercise. He will not give a sh*t if he adjusts it too tight so as to put unnecessary strain on the wheel bearings, gearbox or chain, just so long as it is tighter than before. Your efforts at getting the wheel alignment the best you can, will come nowhere near the dealers "yeah, looks about right to me..........time for lunch!" attitude.
It never takes me less than half an hour to adjust my chain until I'm happy with it. Really p*sses me off when I tighten the axle nut, then find the chain has gone tight.......AGAIN!!:angry. But its gotta be done and takes longer than the 5 minutes (if that) the dealer will do it (incorrectly) in.
At my last service, 6k, I collected my bike and, as expected, the chain was too tight. Made him back it off and do it properly, but in future will specify that they leave the chain alone. I do it myself before I bring it in.
So the message is simple. If you want it done properly, do it yourself. If you're not bothered whether its done properly or not, give your bike and some of your money to the dealer. .....Bet you'll still wanna check it when its done though. :lao
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Hey, Mr Yamaha Stealer:pisson
 

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to revisit this issue... I'm taking my shit to the dealer next time. Despite using a torgue wrench, I apparently overtorqued the axle nut and after coming in from a test ride, decided it need adjusting... went to loosen said nut, and crack - the bracket on the opposite side of my axle broke and turning the nut just spins the axle now.

$100 torque wrench = waste of money... now I'm going to the shop anyway to see how the hell to get this damn thing off.
 

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NASA I'm trying to visualize from memory what you could have broken and can't figure out what exactly you mean. Any chance you can post a pic or point me to a page in the manual?

In any case, what the heck were you tightening the axle with? It would take some serious torque to break anything back there... When you try loosening the axle locknut, do you have a wrench on the opposite side of the axle to keep it from spinning in place?

What sort of torque wrench did you buy?
 

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Jeep...you're in a coma.....NASA has an R1.....

As for the Torque.....breakaway torques will always be higher than setting torque because of friction and time. Put some grease on the threads next time and it won't be so different.

The little nuts, use a crowfoot wrench to torque them or remove the second nut and install and torque them separately.
 

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The rear axle nut and adjuster nuts are all steel so you'd need some serious force to strip or break anything there, i never bother wtih the torque wrench on it, just do it as tight as i can with the wrench in the toolkit. As for the adjusters i just nip em up to a reasonable tightness and away i go. I've got it down now and can adjust my chain in about 5 minutes, chain aligned and everything. I also check chain slack by eye now, i try to push the chain up to the swingarm where the chain guide is, it should be about 1" away from touching the swingarm.

As for the axle moving out of alighnment when tightening, i use the other wrench supplied in the toolkit, fit it onto the other side of the axle in such a way that i can push on it while i tighten the axle (i'm not pushing on it to turn it though, just to stop the axle from moving backwards on that side) If you hold it with enough force you will find it eliminates any movement of the axle whilst tightening!
 

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Odd that this ancient thread is resurrected today! I just adjusted my chain today for the first time after putting it off for two weeks, wondering about having the dealer do it, scared to mess up the alignment, etc.

Anyway, I did it without any real problems. Took maybe 30 minutes including the chain cleaning and lube. I haven't had a chance to take the bike out for more than a few minutes since, but WOW! It feels like a different bike. I guess it was very loose... Couldn't figure out how to check the torque on the axle nut however! I don't have and never will have a socket that big!
 

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I'm gonna have to start checking dates on some of this shit...I didn't realise how old this one was.

Its be nice if anything older than a month got flagged in a different color or something when someone digs it up from the grave....sheesh.
 

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david223 said:
however! I don't have and never will have a socket that big!
If you have the tool kit it came with you do. You can buy the socket for about $5 from Sears. It was worth it to me to buy the socket to get a fairly accurate torque range.
 

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I have a scottoiler on my bike - in 12,000 miles i have adjusted the chain once - and that was right at the beginning when i didn't like the way it was (actually i got a friend to do it because the only time i ever adjusted a chain myself on my old gpz 500 i ended up with a wonky wheel!)
 

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Oh c'mon, there's nothing wrong with this thread. I could have posted up my mistake as a new thread - but it fit this subject.

It's a good warning to be cautious when torquing the axle nut (on R1s particularly). As for the guy that said the spacer/puller is steel... no dice - its aluminum, which means weak.

In the end I had to use a cutting tool to cut the nut off and replaced both the nut and axle. As for the spacer, I machined one from steel with the exact same measurements so this never happens again. There is no way I put much more than 100 lbs on that nut.

To give you a better impression of what went wrong - see attached pic:



And yes, the adjuster screws were fully out and the spacer braced when the damage occured. I even tried an impact wrench to get the nut off, and vice grips to keep the axle from spinning... plus broke a screwdriver and further damaged the spacer trying to fille the gap between spacer & the flat side of the axle... that sucker was ON there.

FYI - the torque wrench I used was a $150 Craftsman I bought a couple days earlier - being someone "borrowed" my old torque wrench and never returned it. It seemed to test out fine, but apparently it is out of spec or something screwed up otherwise.

So no, I probably won't take it to a dealer next time... but its a wake up call to be a little more cautious, even when something is ridiculously simple.
 

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Hey - Got a quick question on this subject. Since I don't have a rear stand, is it best to adjust the chain while the bike is on the kick stand or leaned upright against a wall?
 

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vaanen said:
The rear axle nut and adjuster nuts are all steel so you'd need some serious force to strip or break anything there, i never bother wtih the torque wrench on it, just do it as tight as i can with the wrench in the toolkit.
But can't you over tighten the axle nut to the point of pinching the rear wheel with the swing arm, restricting free spin?

vaanen said:
I also check chain slack by eye now, i try to push the chain up to the swingarm where the chain guide is, it should be about 1" away from touching the swingarm.
Sounds too tight to me but I'm not in front of my bike. You don't want to restrict your rear suspension travel not to mention the other bad effects of over tightening your chain. I think mine just barely touches the swingarm when I lift it with my foot and the rear tire is elevated. I'm going to double check this.
 
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