Sport Bikes banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I want to purcahse a Ninja 500r. Last year I went to a local dealership and saw I believe a 2003 and it was pretty nice. Well I always heard to get a used bike so how used should I go? What is an ok year bike with how many miles? I'm a complete newb to this :(. the 2003 are still almost $4000 so that seems a little too much...I would spring to get it cause I have the money but figured why not got a few years ealier and save a bunch of cash...so whats a good year that doesnt really differ from the 2003 model?

Also How much will the other expenses cost? like helmet, gloves, jacket, boots, and getting it on the road.

Its a bummer by the time I get it will be the end of august... maybe I should wait untill next summer and save more money? I hate to keep putting this off every summer though. If I atleast get it this summer I will have lots of practice for next summer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
498 Posts
The current 500R series of Ninja has not changed since 1994. So if you want maximum parts compatibility, go with 1994 or later. You can steal from any model year from that point on.

Average usage on a bike is 3000 miles/year. Thus, if you find a 1998 500R, if it has 21,000 miles on it, that's ok. Miles on a older bike is a good thing. It means the bike is being ridden regularly and more likely being properly maintained. Alarm bells go off when you see something like a 1994 500R with 5000 miles. It may be a good deal but expect work to get it to a point where it will be road worthy. The bike with higher miles and a higher price might be the better bargain in the long run when you factor in what might be needed to make a neglected or unused bike a street ride.

Gear, I recommend a budget of $1000. You can do it on $500 for everything but your options and choices are much more limited. You can easily spend $400 on a pair of riding boots and pants. Good gloves run $50-$120. Helmet, prices vary widely. Fit is critical. Your helmet must fit correct or it is useless. You can get helmets for as little as $60 off a clearance table all the way to $500+ for high-end models. Consider $180-$300 a good range for a lot of choices. As long as the helmet is DOT approved (Snell is good and I never buy a helmet without Snell approval) and it fits, it will work. Jackets run anywhere from $80 (for cheap textile) up to $500+ for race weight leather. Look for CE approved armor. Consider that mesh and textile gear are best considered "one use" items. If they tear or burn through, they're done. Good compromise for average street riding. I personally prefer armored leather for the greater protective factor (three times that of good mesh/textile). Jeans are not protection. Nor are leather work gloves, work boots, etc. These things will shred at anything above a slow crawl. If a five year old child can wear the knees out of their jeans in a summer of playing in the dirt, how well do you think that same fabric will stand up to being dragged across rough asphalt at 45mph? Get gear you'll want to wear all the time, every time, and WEAR it! Get the best you can afford. Bikes can come and go but gear is constant.

Getting a bike roadworthy depends on what is wrong with it. On a used bike more than a couple years old I expect to replace the tires. The tread is either worn down or their are hairline cracks in the sidewalls. That means the tires are shot. Usually an oil/filter change, new tires (if needed) and a brake fluid replacement (for an older machine) and maybe a coolant flush and valve adjustment is all that is needed to get a used bike into tip-top shape. The first two are not uncommon. Get a bike to a good mechanic and have them look it over before buying it. The $50 or so for that inspection could save you hundreds immediately after the purchase if you don't know what to look for.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
linuxbikr said:
The current 500R series of Ninja has not changed since 1994. So if you want maximum parts compatibility, go with 1994 or later. You can steal from any model year from that point on.

Average usage on a bike is 3000 miles/year. Thus, if you find a 1998 500R, if it has 21,000 miles on it, that's ok. Miles on a older bike is a good thing. It means the bike is being ridden regularly and more likely being properly maintained. Alarm bells go off when you see something like a 1994 500R with 5000 miles. It may be a good deal but expect work to get it to a point where it will be road worthy. The bike with higher miles and a higher price might be the better bargain in the long run when you factor in what might be needed to make a neglected or unused bike a street ride.

Gear, I recommend a budget of $1000. You can do it on $500 for everything but your options and choices are much more limited. You can easily spend $400 on a pair of riding boots and pants. Good gloves run $50-$120. Helmet, prices vary widely. Fit is critical. Your helmet must fit correct or it is useless. You can get helmets for as little as $60 off a clearance table all the way to $500+ for high-end models. Consider $180-$300 a good range for a lot of choices. As long as the helmet is DOT approved (Snell is good and I never buy a helmet without Snell approval) and it fits, it will work. Jackets run anywhere from $80 (for cheap textile) up to $500+ for race weight leather. Look for CE approved armor. Consider that mesh and textile gear are best considered "one use" items. If they tear or burn through, they're done. Good compromise for average street riding. I personally prefer armored leather for the greater protective factor (three times that of good mesh/textile). Jeans are not protection. Nor are leather work gloves, work boots, etc. These things will shred at anything above a slow crawl. If a five year old child can wear the knees out of their jeans in a summer of playing in the dirt, how well do you think that same fabric will stand up to being dragged across rough asphalt at 45mph? Get gear you'll want to wear all the time, every time, and WEAR it! Get the best you can afford. Bikes can come and go but gear is constant.

Getting a bike roadworthy depends on what is wrong with it. On a used bike more than a couple years old I expect to replace the tires. The tread is either worn down or their are hairline cracks in the sidewalls. That means the tires are shot. Usually an oil/filter change, new tires (if needed) and a brake fluid replacement (for an older machine) and maybe a coolant flush and valve adjustment is all that is needed to get a used bike into tip-top shape. The first two are not uncommon. Get a bike to a good mechanic and have them look it over before buying it. The $50 or so for that inspection could save you hundreds immediately after the purchase if you don't know what to look for.
AWESOME!!! thanks dude


I plan on buying the best gear there is especially helmet :D
 

·
old member
Joined
·
13,079 Posts
Great response Linux. I'll only add to check out insurance (you may be surprised) and start with the MSF course if you haven't already.

+1 to getting gear (including riding boots and pants) that you will wear every time you get on the bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
RayOSV said:
Great response Linux. I'll only add to check out insurance (you may be surprised) and start with the MSF course if you haven't already.

+1 to getting gear (including riding boots and pants) that you will wear every time you get on the bike.
there isn't really anything I can do about insurance is there? maybe get a 250? I want to get the motorcycle before the MSF course so i can start learning after the course is over right away and so I don't make a huge ass of myself there :D.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
347 Posts
bottomdog said:
there isn't really anything I can do about insurance is there? maybe get a 250? I want to get the motorcycle before the MSF course so i can start learning after the course is over right away and so I don't make a huge ass of myself there :D.
If you HAVE to get a bike before the MSF course, I wouldn't suggest riding it. It's too easy to pick up bad habits...what's that stat? Some crazy percentage of motorcycle fatalities are self-taught?
 

·
old member
Joined
·
13,079 Posts
bottomdog said:
there isn't really anything I can do about insurance is there? maybe get a 250? I want to get the motorcycle before the MSF course so i can start learning after the course is over right away and so I don't make a huge ass of myself there :D.
You never mentioned if you've ever been on a bike before. If not, how do you know you'll even like it? That's why folks recommend taking the MSF course first. At the end of the course you'll know if you want to continue. Plus, the course is designed for people who have never been on a bike before. You won't make an ass of yourself (no more than usual anyway). :lol

My comment about insurance is that it's another necessary piece of the puzzle and may cost more than you think (everyone's situation is different). Just wanted you to factor that cost into your thinking (bike, gear, insurance). :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
418 Posts
RayOSV said:
Plus, the course is designed for people who have never been on a bike before. You won't make an ass of yourself (no more than usual anyway). :lol
Gotta agree with Ray on this one. That course is definitely designed for people with absolutely no experience. Even if you don't have the basic knowledge of how a clutch works I wouldn't worry much.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Yeah....I havent really had experience on a bike. I'll take the MSF course first.


I'm gonna look for some 250's instead also.



I know I'd like riding anyway, I've wanted to forever.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top