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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey everyone.

I was pretty set on purchasing the Yamaha R3, but I noticed the MPG isn't all that well compared to other bikes in its class. I've read that it's definitely a great performer in its class, but I'm looking to get a sport bike that has great gas mileage in comparison to other bikes in its class.

With that said, I can answer my own question by purchasing a bike with a really small engine and get around 80MPG with it. If I took that route, I believe I would have issues on the highway where I would need some power while traveling 70MPH. For example, when overtaking and changing lanes (if I were forced to do so).

Hence, I've chose to consider bikes up to 500CC. I've come up with the following list. It's short, but it's all I could come up with and would appreciate any other recommendations. Take note that not all of these numbers were pulled from the manufacturers' websites. I did some research and some of these numbers were averages of people's experiences.

CBR300R - 71MPG
CBR500R - 65MPG

G310R - 71MPG

R3 - 56MPG

Ninja 300/400 = 66MPG/?MPG

RC 390 = 60MPG

Again, I would appreciate any other recommendations and what you think I should get for my first bike. Thanks!

*EDIT* Added the G310R to the list after discovering it.
 

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the joke is in your hand
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why is MPG so important to you? just buy the bike you like best and smile. that's all that matters. if your buying a bike for your only mode of transportation in ohio you're making a big mistake.
I would say the yamaha R3 is a more realistic estimate of the MPG. you gotta remember these numbers have become a selling point for cars etc. and it's all a pile of BS. cars that claim they get 40mpg that would be in a vacuum and going down a hill on a mtn with the engine off. lol
 

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I had a ninja 250 and it was not fun doing 70 on the interstate. You felt like you needed more power and I was about 165lbs at the time. I think the Ninja 300 is going to be the same. dont let the extra 50cc fool you, its a marketing gimmick IMO.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Thank you guys for all of your responses.

I've read and watched a good handful of different reviewers' content, and I've finally came down to deciding between the CBR500R and the Ninja 400. What would you guys recommend? I made a list of big and small differences between the two bikes, but I can't share them at the moment because I'm not on my desktop. I'll post what I've gathered when I'm home though.

It would greatly be appreciated if someone who's ridden the two bikes can chime in on some differences between them. Thanks a lot for your guys' help! I can find an unused 2016 CBR500R for $5000-5500, but it seems that I'd have to get the Ninja 400 for close to its full price because it's its first year of production (which is around the same price of the CBR500R anyways).

*EDIT* I'm home now and I wanted to post the following information I had collected between the two from various reviewers...

Ninja - Easier to lean and turn with. Wind resistance is less than that of the CBR's. Less power and torque. Worse gas mileage (not completely sure, real world numbers aren't out yet). Weighs less. Gear indicator equipped. Slipper clutch equipped. Ninja has better power to weight ratio. Tires may be better in regards to hydroplaning (thinner).

CBR - Harder to lean and turn with. Wind resistance is greater than that of the Ninja's. More power and torque. Better gas mileage (not completely sure, real world numbers aren't out yet for the Ninja 400). Weighs more. No gear indicator. No slipper clutch.

Ninja 400 (45HP, 28ft-lbs TQ) P/W Ratio: 0.12295HP/lb and 0.07650TQ/lb
CBR500R (47HP, 32ft-lbs TQ) P/W Ratio: 0.11007HP/lb and 0.07494TQ/lb

I might get picked on for being really gritty with these bikes, but I want to get the best beginner bike and keep it for a really long time. I might as well find out which bike is the better of the two beforehand. MPG really matters most to me too because that's one of the biggest reasons I need a bike. Anyways, I think I should test drive them though, or have someone test drive them for me that knows a thing or two about sport bikes. That's why I'm hoping someone knows something about these two bikes here. Any insight would be appreciated! Thanks again guys.
 

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Mexican Hard Shell Taco
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You know that motorcycles are less aerodynamic than a brick? Stop riding spec sheets and go sit on the fugging bike, whatever bike gives you tingles is the right one. If you don't like the bike it won't matter if it is more aerodynamic, gets better mpgs and can fit a sandwich and a soda under the seat, you won't ride it.
 

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I'm getting about 55 mpg from a DRZ 400 that I commute on during wet weather. It's about as aerodynamic as a barn door with me riding it. If all you care about is fuel economy, it's probably not the way to go. Royal Enfields supposedly don't burn much fuel. They don't go very fast or work so well in less than ideal weather, but you can't have everything.
 

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Mexican Hard Shell Taco
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I guess I should elaborate on my point...

It's your first bike, so you basically know nothing about riding. Deciding on something you have no experience with is impossible, regardless of how many specsheets and reviews you read, and the later is actually worse because you're relying on someone else's impressions, someone else you know nothing about.

You want the best beginer bike? Get something cheap, because you are going to drop it, and I can guarantee it will be in the most stupid way you can think about. Like my track junkie friend, several years of riding under his belt, dropped his brand new R1 at the gas station. Get something cheap that you can flip without taking a huge loss. First things you have to find out are:

- Do you like riding or do you like the idea of riding?
- What kind of riding do you actually want to do?

I've got many low mile bikes thanks to newbies that thought they'd like riding... But they didn't. Got a '13 GSXR 750 in '16 with 250 miles on the clock, that's just an average Sunday ride to me. Even better, got a XJR1300 with only 12 miles on the clock; the guy bought it, rode it around the block and thought it was too big for him, parked it indoors for several years until the wife demanded it had to go.

You can have all these ideas on your mind about riding, but you won't find out if they are true unless you actually do it. So get something cheap and just ride. You might find out that you don't like riding, or that you don't like sportbikes at all and maybe a cruiser or a super moto is better for you.
 

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Aside from the very valid points that Todd has made, no one seems to have touched on something you seem to be angling towards -

Owning a motorcycle does not, penny per mile, save you money when compared to owning an entry model economy car.

Yes, rocking 60-70mpg feels awesome at the pump. But you make up those costs with other incidentals, mainly the drivetrain and tires.

You won't save money. In fact, from the anecdotal evidence of myself and others I've spoken to through the years, you will spend more money on your transportation if you choose this path.

This isn't meant to dissuade you - I've only owned bikes, no cars, since.... 2004?. If you are passionate about riding you'll work it out.

But if you view this as a cost saving measure, I can assure you, the balance will not end in the bikes favor.




Now having said all that, in regards to bike choice - its your first bike not your last. Get a cheap used bike, ride it for a couple months, then get a different one. You can buy three different used bikes for the cost of one new bike. Get a Ninja 250, ride it for a few months and a couple thousand miles. Get a bandit 600, ride it for another couple months and a few more thousand miles. Get a honda shadow and ride it too. Sell a couple, keep the one you like best. Buy another bike, maybe a bit nicer, or a bit more powerful, or just different, like a DRZ or a KLR - get your dual sport on and unleash your inner hooligan.

What looks good to you on the showroom floor may lead to an aching arse, back, neck, or set of knees on the road. Unless you have a stupid amount of money to burn (and if you are concerned with mpg, you don't), I'd advise against a new bike, and get some miles on a bunch of different cheap used bikes that you can resell with little loss.
 

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Thank you guys for all of your responses.

Ninja 400 (45HP, 28ft-lbs TQ) P/W Ratio: 0.12295HP/lb and 0.07650TQ/lb
CBR500R (47HP, 32ft-lbs TQ) P/W Ratio: 0.11007HP/lb and 0.07494TQ/lb
One thing I'd point out, the numbers here look similar but they won't feel the same in real life. The Ninja makes it's max horsepower at a lofty 10,000 rpm and its max torque at 8,000 rpm. That means you pretty much gotta be screaming it to get to the power. The CBR makes its max horsepower at 8,500 rpm and max torque at 7,000 rpm - this is at least closer down to where you will ride 95% of the time. For real-life riding I'd go with the CBR.
 
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