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Midget Rancher
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I ride a 05 636 Ninja stock settings and I am just looking for some input from some more experienced guys on here. The bike feels good to me, but it could be terrible to somebody who knows better...LOL Anyhow turns nice, as for chicken strips I've got about 1/8 inch on right side and 1/4 on left of my tire. Nose dives down significantly under moderate to hard braking. Rear seems kinda stiff, bumps me up outta the seat every once and awhile when I hit a decent bump at speed? Any suggestions or leave it alone? Any input is greatly appreciated!
 

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Official E-Thug
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if it is stock and u havent touched it since the dealer (assuming they left it as well) it is WAAAAAAY soft for you

Another board member has the same bike and I stiffened his up a bit from stock (hes only about 160 lbs) and it is muuuch better, I cant even imagine what urs feels like!!

surfnsb is his name on here... send him a PM
 

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~ Master Technician ~
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I'm about 205lbs too and have the suspension set up on my FZ1 as follows.

Spring preload rear set at max.
Spring preload front 1 notch down from max.
Rebound dampening 3 or 4 clicks down from max (front/back)
compression dampening 3 or 4 clicks down from max (front/back)

It rides a little on the stiff side but I like it that way. This is still not good enough for when my wife gets on with me. With her additional 130lbs, it is just too much for the stock suspension to handle if we ride at a good pace. Normal riding it does fine but it has bottomed out the rear shock on rough roads.

The best thing to do it max out the rebound & compression dampening, count the clicks or notches back down to ensure both forks are set the same and do test rides to get it the way you like. Be sure to write down your settings as you go.

If you do a search, you should be able to find the proper way to adjust the spring preload. You will need to measure the suspension sag.

By the way, chicken strips don't mean jack.
 

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dude... normally i dont say anything but in this case im going to.... WHY in GODS NAME would you think answering this persons question by giving ur suspension settings would help in any way??? Its SO FAR from the kind of bike he is riding its not even funny....

The best thing to do it max out the rebound & compression dampening, count the clicks or notches back down to ensure both forks are set the same and do test rides to get it the way you like. Be sure to write down your settings as you go.

If you do a search, you should be able to find the proper way to adjust the spring preload. You will need to measure the suspension sag.

^^ now that was good advice... otherwise, keep stuff that doesnt make sense or wont help to yourself that is how myths and shit get spread around....
 

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hanglowejohnson said:
dude... normally i dont say anything but in this case im going to.... WHY in GODS NAME would you think answering this persons question by giving ur suspension settings would help in any way??? Its SO FAR from the kind of bike he is riding its not even funny....
It was to give him an idea on what to do. Its not like I am riding a Dyna Glide here. Believe it or not, the FZ1 is a sportbike. It just has a little different riding position and weighs a little more.

Being a heavier than average sportbike rider, he will most likely be setting the suspension up a stiffer than a rider that wieghs 160lbs. A starting point must be made and then adjustments made from there. All 200lb guys don't have the same suspension set up, a lot of it is determined by riding style and person preference.



if it is stock and u havent touched it since the dealer (assuming they left it as well) it is WAAAAAAY soft for you
Another board member has the same bike and I stiffened his up a bit from stock (hes only about 160 lbs) and it is muuuch better, I cant even imagine what urs feels like!!

surfnsb is his name on here... send him a PM


Good advice here slick. What did that tell him beside send a PM to surfnsb. Should have left off that other BS and just said "send PM to surfnsb"
 

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2001FZ1 said:
I'm about 205lbs too and have the suspension set up on my FZ1 as follows.

Spring preload rear set at max.
Spring preload front 1 notch down from max.
Rebound dampening 3 or 4 clicks down from max (front/back)
compression dampening 3 or 4 clicks down from max (front/back)

It rides a little on the stiff side but I like it that way. This is still not good enough for when my wife gets on with me. With her additional 130lbs, it is just too much for the stock suspension to handle if we ride at a good pace. Normal riding it does fine but it has bottomed out the rear shock on rough roads.

The best thing to do it max out the rebound & compression dampening, count the clicks or notches back down to ensure both forks are set the same and do test rides to get it the way you like. Be sure to write down your settings as you go.

If you do a search, you should be able to find the proper way to adjust the spring preload. You will need to measure the suspension sag.

By the way, chicken strips don't mean jack.


Thanks FZ -
I was planning to do my suspension either tomorrow or Thursday.
I know my settings won't be exactly the same as yours because our bikes are a lot different but this gives me a little perspective on preload range for a heavier than average rider. This will save me some time on the trial and error aspect.
I'm 210 and I never see much info on setup for heavy riders.
 

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There is no correlation unless it is by chance. Depends on the bike weight, spring rate, size of the internal spring preload spacer, probably other stuff. The only setup info for heavier riders you need so far as preload is about 30-35mm of sag. It is the same for everyone. Though, since the F4i suspension is soft, I'm betting you can crank the preload adjusters up all the way and still have more sag than you should.
 

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nig said:
There is no correlation unless it is by chance.
that was my point towards the other poster... I at least have some experience with that specific bike... whereas mr fz was posting something that was completely wrong..
 

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hanglowejohnson said:
nig said:
There is no correlation unless it is by chance.
that was my point towards the other poster... I at least have some experience with that specific bike... whereas mr fz was posting something that was completely wrong..
Completely wrong? WTF dude? Did I ever say "Set your suspension just like mine" :bitchslap

You have yet to post anything worth while.



Like nig said, the F4i has soft suspension like most of the Japanese sportbikes. They were just not made for us 200+lb people. With the leathers, helmet and boots we are pushing 220lbs
 

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ahowshare - sorry to hijack your thread man!

FZ & Nig - I beefed up my suspension settings a bit tonight (rear preload maxed out actually) and will do a little riding tomorrow to evaluate and maybe soften a little (especially with a 300 mile freeway trip on Thursday). Damn my bike was soft!

And no - I'm not going to just crank it up and leave it without properly evaluating it.
 

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You really should just measure it. You'll just confuse yourself if you try to "soften" or "harden" the rear end with preload.
 

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OK hozhead and ahowsare, check this out and see if it makes sense.....hopefully it will help in your adjustments.

The primary job of a motorcycle's suspension is to separate the chassis from the effects of bumps and other surface irregularities while simultaneously keeping the tires in contact with the road. Suspension systems have two theoretical components, springing and damping.

The spring controls how much force is required to compress the suspension and the damping controls how quickly the compression and subsequent decompression occurs. The Preload adjustment determines the spring force. More preload, more required force to compress the spring. Less preload, less required force to compress the spring.

Compression damping controls the speed at which the spring is allowed to compress for a given force applied. More compression damping, the slower the spring can compress. Less compression damping, the faster it can respond.

Rebound damping controls the speed at which the spring can rebound following compression. Again, more rebound damping means a slower spring decompression, less rebound damping means faster decompression.

Determining the optimum suspension settings for your bike is as much art as science and has to do with your physical characteristics and riding style as well as the physics of the motorcycle's design.
 

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More preload, more initial force required to get the spring moving, but beyond that (ie, if the suspension sags at all, which it should) it compresses at a relatively constant rate. Preload does not change the spring rate. Seriously, you'll only confuse yourself feeling out the preload, especially on the rear with the swingarm and linkage to take into account; you should measure it. It is just meant to keep the suspension in the correct range within its travel, 1/3 of the way down so that it can extend into dips in one direction and also take up bumps and squat (or dive in the case of the front end) in the other.
 

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nig said:
http://www.sportrider.com/tech/suspension/

Start by setting your sag, go ride it and re-evaluate before touching the damping.

If you just follow this link you can't go wrong. These settings, in the link, are done by profesionals, they happen to be set-up for a track w/150lb rider. Typically you won't need your suspension settings that stiff for the street, but since you weight a little more, they just might be right for you. If not, this will give you a good starting point to adjust from.
 

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2001FZ1 said:
OK hozhead and ahowsare, check this out and see if it makes sense.....hopefully it will help in your adjustments.

The primary job of a motorcycle's suspension is to separate the chassis from the effects of bumps and other surface irregularities while simultaneously keeping the tires in contact with the road. Suspension systems have two theoretical components, springing and damping.

The spring controls how much force is required to compress the suspension and the damping controls how quickly the compression and subsequent decompression occurs. The Preload adjustment determines the spring force. More preload, more required force to compress the spring. Less preload, less required force to compress the spring.

Compression damping controls the speed at which the spring is allowed to compress for a given force applied. More compression damping, the slower the spring can compress. Less compression damping, the faster it can respond.

Rebound damping controls the speed at which the spring can rebound following compression. Again, more rebound damping means a slower spring decompression, less rebound damping means faster decompression.

Determining the optimum suspension settings for your bike is as much art as science and has to do with your physical characteristics and riding style as well as the physics of the motorcycle's design.

I actually do get the suspension principles (and even the specifics). I am using the settings recommended by Sport Rider but have increased preload because I'm quite a bit heavier than the typical rider these settings are for.
The sag on my bike is currently at an acceptable level (32mm is my average measurement).
Though I'm using the recommended damping settings, I do intend to experiment with them tomorrow as I get a chance to go riding. I'll likely never be on a track with this bike (we don't even have one) but will spend some time in mild twisties (did a mountain ride on Saturday that was EXCELLENT btw) - I'll setup the bike accordingly.
 
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