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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good enough deal?

I really can't find anything else here in Cleveland... maybe if I'm lucky, I find a $2400 1994 F2 with twice the mileage and in much worse condition every now and then...

The bike doesn't have much documentation to it, so I'll spend a good hundred $ or so on a tuneup... all fluids and such...

Yeah... so he wants $1700 for it, 11,000 miles, pretty nice condition, only about 1 inch square total of rash on plastic from a lowside, otherwise plastics are perfect, tiny dent on gas tank, little rash spot on an exhaust.

Started up relatively easily, considering the battery needs to be charged.

I went there thinking the bike was a ZX600E, not C, and though I was slightly dissappointed the bike has the 80's Ninja look, on the inside I was screaming "Buy it! Who cares what it looks like? I'm not a poser! I just want to get out there and ride!" I don't know if that was just insane buyer's delight or somethjing...

This would be my first bike... yes, I know I'm an idiot for starting out on a 600. Are these bikes worthy and reliable, or pieces of crap? What problems do they have? Are they competent on the track/twisties?

Any advice would be great.
 

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Old school fool
1994 CB 1000
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Yes they are quite worthy and quite reliable - it's one of the reasons they stuck around so long. They are not as extreme as a more modern 600 and I think it would make a fair starter. It certainly isn't going to run with the big dogs these days, but should still be fun to ride in the twisties and pleasant on the road.

I also like the old style, you don't see them so much these days and it will be unique wherever you go. Also on the plus side is the fact a lot of guys started or had those so you get some nostalgia points. If it's as nice as you say, I think the price is about right too.
 

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Go for it man, just be safe bro!
 

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Check the electronic antidive on the fork, if that year still had one (you can tell by checking to see if there's a little box attached to the bottom of the right fork leg. There should also be an "ESCS" sticker on the legs). Mine was broken, and the bike dived like crazy under braking. Actually, it still dives quite a bit - it's my biggest complaint about the bike. To check, just bounce the fork up and down with the front brake on and the ignition off. Then turn the ignition on - no need to start the bike - and bounce again. You should notice the fork stiffening up.

Getting the valve clearances checked may be a good idea as well, although with 11k miles it's probably not that important yet. From what I understand, it's cheaper and easier to get that done on these bikes than on other ones.

I say go for it. Kawasakis, especially the 600R, tend to sell for MUCH less than their immediate competition of the same year/condition. I still don't know why, as the bikes seem up to par, so to me this makes them a great bargain. $1700 sounds like a steal to me. It's true that you won't run with new bikes, but it's still a hell of a lot quicker than an EX500, and more than enough for a new rider. I've done about 5,000 miles on mine so far (first bike), plan on doubling or tripling that before I get rid of it. It's currently got 30k miles on it, transmission and motor are great. I'm about to change the clutch (not a huge deal).

The handling, according to more experience riders who've tried mine, is nothing spectacular by modern standards. However, as a newbie you'll never notice. Remember that back in the late 80's, this was regarded as a top-level track/canyon carving tool. You'll definitely be able to build skills on it. And the advantage to it over the newer bikes, is that it's much more comfortable. I've done 5-6 hour riding days on it and was in much better shape afterwards than my friend on his newer liter bike. And it's true that you get a bit of the wow-factor with them. They're incredibly rare, at least around where I live. Most riders don't know what it is. For the money, I'm very happy with my bike, and from what you describe, yours sounds like a great deal too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Juniper said:
Check the electronic antidive on the fork, if that year still had one (you can tell by checking to see if there's a little box attached to the bottom of the right fork leg. There should also be an "ESCS" sticker on the legs). Mine was broken, and the bike dived like crazy under braking. Actually, it still dives quite a bit - it's my biggest complaint about the bike. To check, just bounce the fork up and down with the front brake on and the ignition off. Then turn the ignition on - no need to start the bike - and bounce again. You should notice the fork stiffening up.

Getting the valve clearances checked may be a good idea as well, although with 11k miles it's probably not that important yet. From what I understand, it's cheaper and easier to get that done on these bike than on other ones.

I say go for it. Kawasakis, especially the 600R, tend to sell for MUCH less than their immediate competition of the same year/condition. I still don't know why, as the bikes seem up to par, so to me this makes them a great bargain. $1700 sounds like a steal to me. It's true that you won't run with new bikes, but it's still a hell of a lot quicker than an EX500, and more than enough for a new rider. I've done about 5,000 miles on mine so far (first bike), plan on doubling or tripling that before I get rid of it. It's currently got 30k miles on it, transmission and motor are great. I'm about to change the clutch (not a huge deal).

The handling, according to more experience riders who've tried mine, is nothing spectacular by modern standards. However, as a newbie you'll never notice. Remember that back in the late 80's, this was regarded as a track/canyon carving tool. You'll definitely be able to build skills on it. And the advantage to it over the newer bikes, is that it's much more comfortable. I've done 5-6 hour riding days on it and was in much better shape than my friend on his newer liter bike. And it's true that you get a bit of the wow-factor with them. They're incredibly rare, at least around where I live. Most riders don't know what it is. For the money, I'm very happy with my bike, and from what you describe, yours lsounds like a great deal too.
Thank you very much. I will be picking it up Tuesday :).

Do you know if flush mount turn signals are made for these bikes?
 

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I doubt highly that anyone made flushmounts specifically for this bike, but I bet that you could find some that would work. But do you really want to? In my opinion, old-style bikes look much nicer if they're left stock. Otherwise it just looks like you have an old bike and are trying too hard to make it look like a new one, know what I mean? Keep it clean and stock, and people are more likely to admire it, I think. Also keep in mind that the stock ones are much easier for other drivers to see.

Good luck with the bike. If you have any more questions, I'll be glad to try and help. It's not often I come across someone with the same bike. Post some pics if you get the chance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Juniper said:
I doubt highly that anyone made flushmounts specifically for this bike, but I bet that you could find some that would work. But do you really want to? In my opinion, old-style bikes look much nicer if they're left stock. Otherwise it just looks like you have an old bike and are trying too hard to make it look like a new one, know what I mean? Keep it clean and stock, and people are more likely to admire it, I think. Also keep in mind that the stock ones are much easier for other drivers to see.

Good luck with the bike. If you have any more questions, I'll be glad to try and help. It's not often I come across someone with the same bike. Post some pics if you get the chance.
Only reason I asked about the flushmounts is because the right front turn signal is broken and taped up. I thought flushmounts would be cheaper than a replacement one :p.

I would of course keep it clean and stock, I love the look of it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Juniper said:
If you look carefully in the pic, my right one's taped up too.
Must be a design flaw. =P
Haha! That's great. Then I won't feel too bad, I'l just leave it like that or attempt to bondo it up.

My 600R will be red with purple splash and purple wheels. Whoo, go 80's!
 

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Sport Tourer
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The LP flushmounts work. It's a sweet bike. I testrode one before deciding on the Interceptor that I bought today. I dig the 80's style, almost as much as I dig the supersleek racer style. It'll be a GOOD bike, and a passable beginner bike. The stock gearing is a lot tamer than what's popular now. Now, maintenance...

Oil
Brake fluid
Coolant
Chain lube at least--change chain and sprocket at worst
Valves
Battery

Even if he says all this is new, it's better to be SURE. I changed the coolant in my EX when I first bought it, that was "just changed last week" Check out what came out of my radiator... Turns out the guy topped off the reservoir with fresh antifreeze to make it look nice and fresh.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Hagios said:
The LP flushmounts work. It's a sweet bike. I testrode one before deciding on the Interceptor that I bought today. I dig the 80's style, almost as much as I dig the supersleek racer style. It'll be a GOOD bike, and a passable beginner bike. The stock gearing is a lot tamer than what's popular now. Now, maintenance...

Oil
Brake fluid
Coolant
Chain lube at least--change chain and sprocket at worst
Valves
Battery

Even if he says all this is new, it's better to be SURE. I changed the coolant in my EX when I first bought it, that was "just changed last week" Check out what came out of my radiator... Turns out the guy topped off the reservoir with fresh antifreeze to make it look nice and fresh.
The battery was drained when I saw it. He had to jump it with his truck, and even then the bike had a little of a tough time starting. Woudld just charging it work or would it need new acid, also?

Valve adjustment check = big $ at the dealership?

He said the chain and sprocket were replaced recently. How can I check for that?

Also, what are LP flushmounts?
 

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Sport Tourer
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Lockhart Philip makes flushmounts that are universal. They'll work fine on the ZX600. You can check for chain wear by looking at how the rivets line up against the crevices of the sprocket. Then look at the sprocket--if it looks "ground down" or if the teeth aren't uniform then the sprocket is either old, or the chain is overtightened, or some other badness has gone on. Just good to know. Breaking your chain on the highway at 65 (because we always follow the speed limit, -right-?) can be deadly.

On the issue of oil--many people fight over the issue religiously. The bottom line is, don't mix types of oil in the engine. You can switch from syn to semi-syn to dino to syn to dino a hundred times, as long as you DON'T mix the types. Switching from syn to dino without an intermediary semi-syn, I have heard that it's good to fill the oil up and ride for 50 miles and then change the oil again, to dump the last of the dino out. YMMV.

Personally, I prefer using fully Synth oil. It seems to get less dirty between oil changes. Again, YMMV.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Hagios said:
Lockhart Philip makes flushmounts that are universal. They'll work fine on the ZX600. You can check for chain wear by looking at how the rivets line up against the crevices of the sprocket. Then look at the sprocket--if it looks "ground down" or if the teeth aren't uniform then the sprocket is either old, or the chain is overtightened, or some other badness has gone on. Just good to know. Breaking your chain on the highway at 65 (because we always follow the speed limit, -right-?) can be deadly.

On the issue of oil--many people fight over the issue religiously. The bottom line is, don't mix types of oil in the engine. You can switch from syn to semi-syn to dino to syn to dino a hundred times, as long as you DON'T mix the types. Switching from syn to dino without an intermediary semi-syn, I have heard that it's good to fill the oil up and ride for 50 miles and then change the oil again, to dump the last of the dino out. YMMV.

Personally, I prefer using fully Synth oil. It seems to get less dirty between oil changes. Again, YMMV.
Thank you very much.

What weight oil should I use?
 

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Old school fool
1994 CB 1000
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I usually run regular oil in my vehicles. As long as you are good about keeping it changed, you should have few problems.

I ran 20/50 in my old KZ, but looking back that may have been overkill. I'm sure it didn't hurt the bike (after all it is air cooled and a heavier weight oil should hold up better) but you might check with a dealer anyhow.
 

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I ran 15/50 in my old EX and she loved it. Can't go wrong with Mobil 1 goldcap :dblthumb
 
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