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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I've had a 07 ZX10R since new. Still love it and don't plan on selling it. To complement that bike tho, I was thinking of going the 600 route. 2013 636 is what I'm leaning on. But an 09-and up R6 or ZX6R would be cool too. Anybody go from a 1000 to 600? Love to hear all of your expert opinions on the pros and cons for 1000 vs 600. (I've ridden several 600s, just never owned one) Plan to keep one in Florida and one in MI
 

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I have a 675, which is essentially a 600. It's capable enough that I have never seen the point in a liter bike. For what it's worth, the local lap record at a track out here was by a rider on a 600 for a while. That same rider had access to liter bikes, but decided that the slight weight and tractability advantage of a 600 outweighed the raw power advantage of the liter bike. As a practical matter, I don't think it matters much on the street.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I have a 675, which is essentially a 600. It's capable enough that I have never seen the point in a liter bike. For what it's worth, the local lap record at a track out here was by a rider on a 600 for a while. That same rider had access to liter bikes, but decided that the slight weight and tractability advantage of a 600 outweighed the raw power advantage of the liter bike. As a practical matter, I don't think it matters much on the street.
I like those 675s. Wouldn't mind one of those either. Yeah the liter is definitely overkill. The track is another reason why I want a 600. Although, most of my riding is street so I agree it doesn't really matter, guess I just want what I don't have.
 

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I had a blast on the track with the 675. I also had a blast with an SV650 on the track. It's more fun wringing the most out of less than it is walking away when you have overpowering horsepower. For me anyway. If you really want to get into it, a 300 is probably more than plenty on the street, but I won't be giving up the magic carpet ride that is the 675. It boggles my mind that it's a nearly 12 year old bike now. It still seems fresh and new every time I ride it.
 

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the joke is in your hand
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the way of the KTM too. makes no sense. oh well. it does seem apparent that sportbike sales as a whole are down. probably mostly due to they last so long and people keep them longer.
 

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Don't tease the dragon
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Three are many days when the middle weight makes more sense, and rarely is it the literbike that makes sense, unless it's just wide open straight line ripping, or tracks with that type of layout.

if you get a middleweight and set it up properly, you may find your literbike not being the key you grab when you go to ride.

Also - a smaller/More forgiving bike will help you hone your skills.
 

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the way of the KTM too. makes no sense. oh well. it does seem apparent that sportbike sales as a whole are down. probably mostly due to they last so long and people keep them longer.
It boggles my mind a little, but my 675 will be 12 years old next March, according to the build date on the label on the frame. It hasn't given me any reason to want to replace it.
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
I had a blast on the track with the 675. I also had a blast with an SV650 on the track. It's more fun wringing the most out of less than it is walking away when you have overpowering horsepower. For me anyway.
^Agreed^

I don't get why triumph has discontinued the 675
That's a damn travesty.

@shamrock--That 675R is hella sexy

Three are many days when the middle weight makes more sense, and rarely is it the literbike that makes sense, unless it's just wide open straight line ripping, or tracks with that type of layout.

if you get a middleweight and set it up properly, you may find your literbike not being the key you grab when you go to ride.
^That has been my thought process.


I've still been actively on the hunt. Doing a nationwide search--only dealer searches that will ship (hopefully for free). It's interesting to see that the average price for a 2013 636 is around $7-8k with anywhere from 2-15,000 miles. Yet, there are 2016 636s that you can get with 0 miles for 8500. I would just get new if I'm gonna spend that much.

A good 2009-2012 Japanese 600 you can get for $5-7k depending on mileage of course. I'm only considering the R6 and ZX6R for that year range.

The 675s are pretty rare, and the 675Rs are even more rare. I would love to snag either one of those for the right price. I'm a newbie when it comes to Triumph, but have always liked 'em.

I think the prices will drop after Christmas. That's when I've always bought discounted bikes before.
 

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Mexican Hard Shell Taco
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I've never understood the fascination with literbikes... To me they are like having a 20" cock, good for bragging rights but useless most of the time. In my country there is only on racetrack where you can use the extra power from a literbike on the main straight, the rest of the tracks are small and technical and you'll have a much easier time with a 600. On the road I think they are more pointless, any 600 can do license losing speeds in a blink of an eye, not to mention it is downright suicidal to keep a 600 at its limits on the street.

Few months ago I got a Daytona 675R to replace my GSXR 750. It is a bit down on power compared to the 750, but it is only noticeable when you're way past 125mph. I still think the 750 was a better bike, it was friendlier, like those comfy shoes you can wear all day long...

But they don't have ABS. And I'm only ranting about literbikes because those are the only ones that got good e-nannies; the rest of them are stuck with prehistoric electronic aids.


That being said, not all 600s were created equal. When I went from a 2008 GSXR 600 to a 2011 GSXR 600 I was a bit disapointed on the lack of top end power; but the powerband on the 11 was much more usable. That was a bike you could ride in 6th gear and make quick passes on the highway without downshifting... Unlike an R6 which can't get out of it's own way unless you're into the powerband, and by the time you got it into the powerband and it starts moving you're already in reckless driving territory.

Then I got the 750; fantastic bike, it felt just like the 600 it replaced after I put a -1 front sprocket, but with standard gearing. Cover the tachometer and I couldn't tell the difference in weight and handling between them. Icing on the cake was 15% more miles to the gallon. If you can live without ABS, the 750 is my top pick; they are a dime a dozen. Also you'll save on gear; everybody knows GSXRs don't start up if you're wearing proper gear because the calamari inmobilizer.
 

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Well, I am surprised that why would you like to have a downgrading. Just maintain the engine and keep the meter running. May be low engine power do not be able to deliver performance. because powerful engine normally have heavy body and chassis.
 

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I'll say it. I like a liter bike.

Because I'm lazy.

I like riding a track with only gears 2,3 and 4.

I'm about 220#, and like having a bike accelerate my heft without having to change down all the time.

That said, I also appreciate the camp that says: "It's more fun to ride a slow bike fast, than a fast bike slow." Not that a 600 is a "slow bike" by any means, but the sentiment that it's more fun to wring out power, and use your skill, is a sentiment that I appreciate.

Enjoy!!
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
I've never understood the fascination with literbikes... To me they are like having a 20" cock, good for bragging rights but useless most of the time. In my country there is only on racetrack where you can use the extra power from a literbike on the main straight, the rest of the tracks are small and technical and you'll have a much easier time with a 600. On the road I think they are more pointless, any 600 can do license losing speeds in a blink of an eye, not to mention it is downright suicidal to keep a 600 at its limits on the street.

Few months ago I got a Daytona 675R to replace my GSXR 750. It is a bit down on power compared to the 750, but it is only noticeable when you're way past 125mph. I still think the 750 was a better bike, it was friendlier, like those comfy shoes you can wear all day long...


Then I got the 750; fantastic bike, it felt just like the 600 it replaced after I put a -1 front sprocket, but with standard gearing. Cover the tachometer and I couldn't tell the difference in weight and handling between them. Icing on the cake was 15% more miles to the gallon. If you can live without ABS, the 750 is my top pick; they are a dime a dozen. Also you'll save on gear; everybody knows GSXRs don't start up if you're wearing proper gear because the calamari inmobilizer.
I agree that a liter on the streets is overkill. I started on an old 500 and then jumped to ZX7R, which was a fat pig and wasn't injected. But I loved it. Back then I always wanted to experience the absurdity of the infamous 1000. So I came across a deal on the 10R and pulled the tr*****. Now I want the 6. Little out of order, but so what.

The only benefit the 1000 has over a 600 IMO is longevity. Because the liter has so much more power, you don't need to rev it nearly as high for thrills. Mine redlines at 13k and I often stay below 8, and cruise around 3-5. A 600 would be much higher, which I have to believe would be more wear and tear even if it is designed for it.


Well, I am surprised that why would you like to have a downgrading. Just maintain the engine and keep the meter running. May be low engine power do not be able to deliver performance. because powerful engine normally have heavy body and chassis.
I intend to. Current bike is a lifer for me. 23k on it now, I wanna see 100. Only thing I've replaced is tires and fluids. Just don't see the point in having two 1000s. Want something different.


I'll say it. I like a liter bike.

Because I'm lazy.

I like riding a track with only gears 2,3 and 4.

I'm about 220#, and like having a bike accelerate my heft without having to change down all the time.

That said, I also appreciate the camp that says: "It's more fun to ride a slow bike fast, than a fast bike slow." Not that a 600 is a "slow bike" by any means, but the sentiment that it's more fun to wring out power, and use your skill, is a sentiment that I appreciate.

Enjoy!!
I concur. Lol. But I wanna wring something's neck.
 

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Mexican Hard Shell Taco
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Longevity? There are plenty of Ninja 250s with over 50K miles on their original top ends, and those have to be redlined all the time! They are designed to be revved up, it's not going to hurt anything. There aren't that many sportbikes with high mileage because more often than not they are neglected and/or wrecked.

I had to rebuild my Versys 650 engine at 60,000kms (about 37,000 miles) because the thermostat failed closed and the head warped beyond repair. Obviously I was curious on how it was holding up as I do feel I push that bike to its limits quite a bit (it has only got 60 hp in a good day, more like 46hp at Mexico City elevation). The cylinders had perfect honing marks, the ring gap (wear) was close to the lower limit, valve guides had no noticeable wear... If the thermostat hadn't failed that engine would have been good for a very long time. In the USA, with the expensive labor rates, that bike would have likely been parted out, proving that "smaller engines do not last". But a failed thermostat could have ruined any kind of engine.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I guess I've just rarely seen 600s with high miles that were still tip-top. Maybe that's the fault of the owners for umpteen different reasons. And yes, many do get wrecked. Everything has a breaking point tho, and nothing is designed forever. Would you argue a modern super sport engine should last as long as a modern car engine? Because I'd be quite impressed to see 200k miles on any original super sport motor.
 
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