Can I replace my own fork seals??? - Sportbikes.net
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post #1 of 3 (permalink) Old 12-30-2005, 11:50 AM Thread Starter
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Can I replace my own fork seals???

How hard is it to replace my own fork seals on an '03 Hayabusa? I used to be an auto mechanic, so I'm not easily intimidated, but I don't know if I need special tools to do this. Would I be better off just bringing it to a service center? how much would it cost to replace one (blown out) fork seal?

Thanks in advance!

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post #2 of 3 (permalink) Old 12-30-2005, 11:59 AM
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Oh man, you're in the same boat as I am. But both my seals are leaking. I've already pulled out my forks, and am just waiting for my mechanic to get back from vacation so that I can take them to him. I can do alot of stuff myself, but looking at this, and not having any special tools, I figured I'd take it to my mechanic, but you may be able to do it yourself. When I checked with my Honda shop, they said it would be around $100 bucks to put the seals in for me. The mechanic I use works at a Harley shop, so I'm not sure if the price will be different there.

Here is what I have found recently. It was posted by someone who did his own swap on a Busa
Hoist the bike up off the front tire making sure no pressure is on the forks. Remove the front tire, in accordance with you owners manual. Remove the front fender bolts from the side that you are working on. Do only one side at a time, or so they say. Loosen the 2 12 mm bolts holding at the bottom of the triple tree. Loosen the to 8 mm allen at the top of the triple tree, and make sure that you have a friend standing by, cause that fork is coming out, fast. Turn the shock upside down, with the fender holding assemble pointing up. Using a 10mm allen socket, and an impact wrench, break the inside bolt free. An impact wrench is needed, because if you try to loosen this bolt by any other means you will not be able to break it free, it just spins. When the bolt is removed, keep it upright, and find something to dump the oil into. Holding both the top and the bottom part of the fork, filp it right side up, and the oil, if any is left will pour out the bottom. By this time the insert part of the fork will slide right out. Pull the old dust cover off, remove the retaining clip, pull out the old seal. Now the old seal is easily removed using a screwdrive and prying it out. It will pop out and fly across the room. There is a washer below it. One side is rounded one side is flat. The flat side goes down. Reverse this procedure, making sure to push the seal down squarely, using a big socket, or anything else that you might have availible. When everything is back together, remove the top part of the shock. This is the section where your dampening adjustments are. I wrapped a cloth around my shock and put it in a vise, and used a really big adjustable wrench to break it free. Once you have the shock cap off, pour in 16.2 ounces of fork oil, screw the cap back on, and put it back on the bike. I say the whole thing could be down in about 2 hours. I put my shocks thru a pretty good workout last night, bumpy roads, and few wheelies, hard breaking. Neither one is leaking.

Hope some of that helps.

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post #3 of 3 (permalink) Old 12-30-2005, 12:05 PM
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^^ One thing I did already (and dfferently than the above instructions) was to loosten the top nut on the fork. The instructions say to put it in a vice after the fork is out, but if you slide the fork tube down a couple inches when you are taking them out, then retighten the bottom tripple tree clamp, it will hold the fork for you and you can get a wrech on the top nut without putting anything in a vice and maybe scratching something up.

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