Is an SV650 too much? - Page 2 - Sportbikes.net
 

Home Message Board SBN Chat SBN Articles Bike Specs Register Classifieds Forum Rules Advertise Contact Us

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.
Go Back   Sportbikes.net > Topic Discussions > New Riders
Register Subscribe Casino Garage FAQ Members List Calendar Arcade Insurance Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Motorcycle Escrow


New Riders Welcome to those just starting out or interested in learning more about motorcycling. Please read the stickies, and feel free to ask questions.

» Insurance


» Site Sponsors
Reply
 
LinkBack (2907) Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 11-20-2012, 08:15 AM   676 links from elsewhere to this Post. Click to view. #16 (permalink)
pacman
AS LONG AS YOU RIDE
 
pacman's Avatar
 

Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Venise-en-Québec, Québec, Canada
Age: 54
Posts: 47
Gameroom cash: $647
Sportbike: 2012 Yamaha FZ1 - 2012 Yamaha R1
Thanks: 0
Thanked 6 Times in 5 Posts
pacman is on a distinguished road
Talking

Any kind of bikes could be ''too much'' if the person on it has no fear and wants to be Rossi...
It's like trying to run when you have not walk yet...

It's all between the ears and how the right wrist executes

Seriously, if you have some experience and you are well aware of the capabilities of the bike versus yours, you should be in business.

More cc & hp's means you'll surprise yourself faster...

Have fun.
__________________
Al. (2012 FZ1 & 2012 R1)
pacman is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 11-20-2012, 11:57 AM   #17 (permalink)
UltimateOG
World 500 GP Racer
 
UltimateOG's Avatar
 

Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Oceanside, CA
Age: 26
Posts: 2,661
Gameroom cash: $17790
Sportbike: 11 Ninja 650R (RIP), 05 ZX6R (RIP), 05 ZX6R (Second Chance)
Thanks: 406
Thanked 462 Times in 312 Posts
UltimateOG is on a distinguished road
Default

Hey OP, the Ninja 300 has ABS and Fuel Injection....just sayin.
__________________
When Life Gets Hard, Play Harder.
UltimateOG is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-2012, 06:35 AM   #18 (permalink)
johnnywha5
SBN Newb
 

Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: NOVA
Posts: 27
Gameroom cash: $730
Sportbike: 2008 Honda CBR600 RR
Thanks: 1
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
johnnywha5 is on a distinguished road
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by OreoGaborio View Post
Word of wisdom I tell all my MSF grads and new riders... "It's your FIRST bike.... not your last."

In other words, don't over-think (cc's, carbs, whatever... really doesn't make that much of a difference)
And don't over-buy (cheap bikes don't depreciate... buy cheap, sell cheap.)

Nothing says you have to keep what you buy for more than a few months if you don't like it.
I agree! When I was looking around for my first bike a month ago, I only had one category in mind, it has to be a sportbike. Didn't care what brand, year, color, technology, etc... I just wanted to ride really bad! I'm in love with my CBR!
johnnywha5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-2012, 02:30 PM   #19 (permalink)
Prier84
SBN Rookie
 

Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Arkansas
Age: 29
Posts: 27
Gameroom cash: $675
Sportbike: 07 suzuki gsxr 600
Thanks: 0
Thanked 3 Times in 1 Post
Prier84 is on a distinguished road
Default

It's all up to you and how mature you are and how much respect you have for the bike. I started on a sv650 for less than a month before I got a gsxr 600 just because I couldn't pass up the deal I was offered. Neither one have ever got me in trouble because I respect them and have only rode within my skill set the more experience I got the harder I started riding just take it easy and only ride as hard as your comfortable with and you'll be ok. Seriously though just respect respect respect the bike no matter how small of one you get and be very attentive to traffic and you'll be fine
Prier84 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-2012, 08:32 PM   #20 (permalink)
GoIllini
Clueless Newbie
 
GoIllini's Avatar
 

Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Princeton NJ
Age: 28
Posts: 786
Gameroom cash: $6571
Sportbike: '06 Triumph Daytona 675
Thanks: 3
Thanked 5 Times in 4 Posts
GoIllini will become famous soon enough
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Soulbreeze View Post
~~
I've read tons of thread/posts on starter bikes. The SV650 is universally not suggested as a starter bike, but it's also not usually excluded as one either.

As I've read many opinions on starting on one, I'd like to see what ya'll think about it. I've come to know that many of you have a lot of experience and I actually trust your guys' opinions more than most. I know the front shocks are usually craptacular (at least when you start pushing the bike). I'm not too concerned about that. There's way too many gravel/sand/debris variables on any road i could 'carve' around here so all turns have to been taken with apprehension. I won't be pushing lean hard in these parts, it's just flat out not safe to do so.

Thing is, I want FI. I live in Wisconsin and work 3rd shift. This means a ton of 7 a.m. starts. I don't want to have to pop full choke for 5 minutes before I can ride. This leaves few options for a starter:

CBR250: Won't buy. Too many say it's weak and I have qualms about thumpers (Duke 390 looks pretty bad-ass though, ain't gonna lie, heh).

Ninja 300: My current top option. Local dealer will give me high 2,000's trade in for my Genuine Blur scooter. (4800 MSRP)

SV650: 2003+ for FI. Have found a TON of them around me for mid 3,000's. Various mileage. These dealer's, however, probably won't give me more than 2-2.5k for my scooter. Plus side is my local dealer is a Suzuki dealer, so servicing will be a non-issue.

So it drops down to a new Ninja 300 or a used SV with FI for now. The new Honda 500's don't really excite me for their price. GW250 looks pretty nice, but I'm not sure it'll handle the freeway properly for what I need (45 Minute Commute. 18 miles or so Freeway).

TL;DR Is the SV650 too much bike for someone who only has 2k miles experience on a scooter and only 10 hours of MSF training on a shifter?
~~
Starting a carbureted bike in the winter is a real killer; even moreso in Wisconsin than New Jersey. I'll give you that. When I had the 250 (old model), it needed to be above 45 degrees for the bike to start.

I think the Ninja 300 is fuel injected. I'd urge you to consider that.

I think your experience on the scooter helps you a bit, but not as much as you'd think. You've probably learned some of the paranoid defensive driving habits required to survive on two wheels, but I'm not sure you've learned throttle control with a 50cc engine or some of the details of taking curves yet.
GoIllini is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-2012, 11:34 PM   #21 (permalink)
Soulbreeze
Umbrella Girl
 

Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Lake Geneva, WI
Age: 35
Posts: 48
Gameroom cash: $932
Sportbike: '09 Suzuki SFV650 Gladius
Thanks: 3
Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Soulbreeze is on a distinguished road
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by GoIllini View Post
Starting a carbureted bike in the winter is a real killer; even moreso in Wisconsin than New Jersey. I'll give you that. When I had the 250 (old model), it needed to be above 45 degrees for the bike to start.

I think the Ninja 300 is fuel injected. I'd urge you to consider that.

I think your experience on the scooter helps you a bit, but not as much as you'd think. You've probably learned some of the paranoid defensive driving habits required to survive on two wheels, but I'm not sure you've learned throttle control with a 50cc engine or some of the details of taking curves yet.
~~
Yeah, you see what I'm saying about that cold starting stuff. I'll drive it until it's around freezing temps outside so carbs sound like a headache. The 300 is still my front runner.

And the scoot was a Blur SS220i. 220cc "sport" scooter (their quote, not mine heh). Not a sportbike by any stretch of the imagination, but it cornered more like a sportbike than a scooter according to reviews I read before I bought it. Scraped that damn center stand on more than one occasion. >.<
~~
Soulbreeze is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-23-2012, 01:12 PM   #22 (permalink)
singram
500 G.P. Champion
 
singram's Avatar
 

Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Chicago
Posts: 2,234
Gameroom cash: $20735
Sportbike: CBR F4i / Kawi ZX6E
Thanks: 56
Thanked 457 Times in 282 Posts
singram is on a distinguished road
Default

Quote:
When I had the 250 (old model), it needed to be above 45 degrees for the bike to start.
You should have tended to your carbs(or battery?) alittle better. I've gone round and round for years with the carbs on my late Ninja 500, and my current 93 ZX6E(both with the same Keihin carbs as your 250 I believe). Both bikes were able to start WELL under freezing.

Its my firm belief that anyone who bitches and moans and under-rates carbs are people that are ignorant in the mechanics of their machine, and in general know nothing about carbs or how to maintain/repair/tune 'em.


Quote:
Thing is, I want FI. I live in Wisconsin and work 3rd shift. This means a ton of 7 a.m. starts. I don't want to have to pop full choke for 5 minutes before I can ride.
Not sure where you got this, but you dont have to wait 5 minutes before you can ride a carbed bike at low temp. Not even close. As a matter of fact, its advisable that you DONT. For obvious reasons, its beneficial to get the oil fully circulating and bring an engine up to operating temperature as soon as possible. What better way to do this then put it under load as soon as possible? Without hammering the shit out of it, my 19 year old ZX is out of the driveway within 30 seconds of turning the key and able to safely make full power within a mile.

IMO, I think its foolish to yourself to FI only for your first bike without fully understanding carbs.


Quote:
Honda CBR500R is a good choice. New for this year.
If life has taught me one thing well, its "Never Buy ANYTHING new for this year". Not a Ninja300, not a CBR500, nothing. Same is true with cars and electronics. Let some other fool open their wallet to be the R/D guinea pig. Once all the failures, weaknesses and recalls are hammered out, buy the 2nd/3rd gen.
__________________
Warm bodies, I sense, are not machines that can only make money…
excerpt from Pillar of Davidson
singram is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-23-2012, 09:04 PM   #23 (permalink)
bluspyder
500 G.P. Champion
 
bluspyder's Avatar
 

Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Concord, North Carolina
Age: 27
Posts: 1,869
Gameroom cash: $9025
Sportbike: 2000 KTM Duke 2, 2002 Suzuki V-Strom
Thanks: 284
Thanked 322 Times in 237 Posts
bluspyder is on a distinguished road
Default

Op. I

A lot of your main concerns have been addressed and you have been given enough information to make a logical choice in the near future.

But, if your looking for justification to by a brand new bike your not going to find it here. We've all been in your position. When I started in the motorcycle culture I wanted a yahama r6. I thought it was the best looking bike on the market. Well after a few years and a few miles I have come to realize that the r6 is a uncomfortable bike and difficult to ride. I never pictured my self as a supermoto guy.... Manly because I didn't know about them. The points im trying the last make is: 1) motorcycling is a very dangerous thing to get into. 2) your first bike isn't going to be your last. I've owned 5 in 5 years. You'll find the bike you love and stick with that model.

Sent from my DROIDX
__________________
Remember......Keep the rubber side down!!!!

bluspyder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-23-2012, 09:40 PM   #24 (permalink)
GoIllini
Clueless Newbie
 
GoIllini's Avatar
 

Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Princeton NJ
Age: 28
Posts: 786
Gameroom cash: $6571
Sportbike: '06 Triumph Daytona 675
Thanks: 3
Thanked 5 Times in 4 Posts
GoIllini will become famous soon enough
Default

..

Last edited by GoIllini; 11-23-2012 at 10:29 PM.
GoIllini is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-23-2012, 09:53 PM   #25 (permalink)
Shamrock627
After Me Lucky Charms
 
Shamrock627's Avatar
 

Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Kentucky
Age: 43
Posts: 4,686
Gameroom cash: $85268
Sportbike: 2009 Triumph Daytona 675
Thanks: 681
Thanked 524 Times in 344 Posts
Shamrock627 is on a distinguished road
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by singram View Post
If life has taught me one thing well, its "Never Buy ANYTHING new for this year". Not a Ninja300, not a CBR500, nothing. Same is true with cars and electronics. Let some other fool open their wallet to be the R/D guinea pig. Once all the failures, weaknesses and recalls are hammered out, buy the 2nd/3rd gen.
But by buying the first gen of a model means you will learn how to wrench for yourself.
Shamrock627 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-23-2012, 10:53 PM   #26 (permalink)
GoIllini
Clueless Newbie
 
GoIllini's Avatar
 

Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Princeton NJ
Age: 28
Posts: 786
Gameroom cash: $6571
Sportbike: '06 Triumph Daytona 675
Thanks: 3
Thanked 5 Times in 4 Posts
GoIllini will become famous soon enough
Default

Quote:
You should have tended to your carbs(or battery?) alittle better. I've gone round and round for years with the carbs on my late Ninja 500, and my current 93 ZX6E(both with the same Keihin carbs as your 250 I believe). Both bikes were able to start WELL under freezing.
Singram, a 250 struggles to turn over below freezing let alone getting around to worrying about the carbs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by singram View Post
Its my firm belief that anyone who bitches and moans and under-rates carbs are people that are ignorant in the mechanics of their machine, and in general know nothing about carbs or how to maintain/repair/tune 'em.
So in other words, what you're really saying is that carbs require a bit of work and specific knowledge that isn't required quite as much of fuel injection. Good, we agree. We just disagree on how much.

We haven't yet mentioned the fact that the carbs are BURIED in the depths of the Ninja 250 (at least the old model) if you ever want to get them out for a total cleaning. This is not working on some '66 Corvette where you can take off the air filter and watch a stream of gasoline get sucked into the engine. This is taking half the bike apart, piece by piece, so you can move the back fender to move the battery box to move the air filter box, so you can get a wrench in there and undo four power-wrenched nuts, so you can get the carbs out to do a deep cleaning. Then carefully put all 30 similar looking screws back on to reassemble the bike. God help you if you messed something up and have to take everything back off. God help you if you lose one of those thirty screws and need to order one (The local dealer probably won't have it in stock; they didn't even have a clutch cable, a commonly used part, when I replaced mine a few years ago.) Or you can have a mechanic do it for you for ~$500+.

For those of us who ride motorcycles but do not LIVE motorcycles, the carbs on the Ninja 250 are a real bitch to deal with. I am guessing that it will be similar for a Ninja 500 and the new Ninja 250, but I could be wrong.

I don't disagree with your overall point. Carbs aren't that complicated and in all honesty I am a mechanically helpless yuppie who can do little more than change a clutch cable and the oil/oil filter and try to figure out where the other fluids go. On a good day, I can drain carb float bowls, replace a burnt out signal bulb, and maybe change the spark plugs if I'm lucky. Carbs are probably the most straightforward mechanical problem on a motorcycle that I can't deal with; they're sure as heck easier than trying to find a short. However, the Ninja 250 makes working on the carbs hell if you need to do a deep clean after 2-3 winters. To get a Ninja 250 through three years of regular use, you will need to learn how to do all of this, and you'll still need to visit the mechanic to change the chain and the rear tires. (I also have them handle the front tires; installing tires scares the heck out of me.)

To get a well-designed fuel injected bike through three years of regular use, it's a bit less work. It requires a lot less thinking. That's thinking and time and weekends that you can apply to your job or to riding or to other fun stuff.

It also looks like the Ninja 500 website agrees with me:

Carburetor Maintenance - EX-500.com

Carb maintenance "dominates the mechanical time you spend on your bike". In other words, want to spend fewer precious weekends cleaning carbs and more weekends riding? Get fuel injection!

Quote:
If life has taught me one thing well, its "Never Buy ANYTHING new for this year". Not a Ninja300, not a CBR500, nothing. Same is true with cars and electronics. Let some other fool open their wallet to be the R/D guinea pig. Once all the failures, weaknesses and recalls are hammered out, buy the 2nd/3rd gen.
You raise a good point here. Should you go with the devil you know or the devil you don't know?

The CBR 250 is about to be in its third model year and it's fuel injected. Maybe that's an option too.


OP, as you can see, owning a motorcycle requires a certain degree of mechanical commitment and on top of that still just as much time spent at the mechanic's shop, mile per mile. Instead of changing the oil every 6,000 miles, which you do yourself at home, you're getting new tires, or getting a new chain, or getting the 6,000 mile service as per the manual.

Last edited by GoIllini; 11-24-2012 at 09:25 AM.
GoIllini is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2012, 12:54 AM   #27 (permalink)
Soulbreeze
Umbrella Girl
 

Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Lake Geneva, WI
Age: 35
Posts: 48
Gameroom cash: $932
Sportbike: '09 Suzuki SFV650 Gladius
Thanks: 3
Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Soulbreeze is on a distinguished road
Default

~~
As much as I'd like an FI bike, I'm not totally opposed to a Ninja 500 at the right price. In fact, there is one at my local dealer. 2007 Ninja 500. 11k miles. Asking 2900. No marks on the plastics or otherwise that it has been dropped. This would be the smartest choice imo. Asking price is near my trade-in value so wouldn't have much effect on my loan other than another finance charge.

Whatever bike I get, I plan on getting a shop manual and learning a bit. The only issue is, I have no garage. There's no pulling it inside when it's cold. I work on it in the driveway and that's it.

I've been going back and forth constantly. One week, I'm thinking a used SV would be a good buy. Another, I'm thinking a new 300 under warranty would be perfect. Week after that I'm thinking a Ninja 500 would be nice and the carbs wouldn't be an issue.

At this point, I honestly think it's going to depend which way I'm leaning when it's time for me to actually buy. And I don't think any of the choices I could make at this point are bad ones. Yes, I could drop a new bike and be kicking myself in the ass, but I could also not. People say "you're gonna drop it", but you don't know that. Not everyone drops their first bike in their first few months. We shall see I guess. I never came close to dropping my Blur and that's 325lbs wet. I blame a lifetime of soccer and skateboarding.

Last edited by Soulbreeze; 11-24-2012 at 01:00 AM.
Soulbreeze is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2012, 01:11 AM   #28 (permalink)
GoIllini
Clueless Newbie
 
GoIllini's Avatar
 

Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Princeton NJ
Age: 28
Posts: 786
Gameroom cash: $6571
Sportbike: '06 Triumph Daytona 675
Thanks: 3
Thanked 5 Times in 4 Posts
GoIllini will become famous soon enough
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Soulbreeze View Post
~~
As much as I'd like an FI bike, I'm not totally opposed to a Ninja 500 at the right price. In fact, there is one at my local dealer. 2007 Ninja 500. 11k miles. Asking 2900. No marks on the plastics or otherwise that it has been dropped. This would be the smartest choice imo. Asking price is near my trade-in value so wouldn't have much effect on my loan other than another finance charge.

Whatever bike I get, I plan on getting a shop manual and learning a bit. The only issue is, I have no garage. There's no pulling it inside when it's cold. I work on it in the driveway and that's it.
Get a bike cover, get an extension cord, and get one of those small electric heaters. ALWAYS keep the bike under cover (whether or not it's carbureted). It's the second best thing to storing it inside. And you'll need the electric heater for warming the bike up to start it. Just remember not to park it away from home, or to park it somewhere warm when you need to get the heater out to start it.

Quote:
I've been going back and forth constantly. One week, I'm thinking a used SV would be a good buy. Another, I'm thinking a new 300 under warranty would be perfect. Week after that I'm thinking a Ninja 500 would be nice and the carbs wouldn't be an issue.
If it's any comfort, the carbs won't be an issue for probably at least a winter or two. Especially if you're riding every day, including the winter. Problem is that if you let the gasoline sit for too long (five or six weeks), it gets stale, and it's going to gum up the carburetor. If this happens for a few winters, you'll need to pull the darned thing out and let it sit in Pine Sol for a few days (Ninja250.org describes this process in gory detail).

Singram may know something I don't. There is also some old wive's tale about this special carburetor cleaner fluid you can put in your gas tank that won't damage the Ninja 250's carburetor that will give you a partial but not complete cleaning. I'd like to think I know enough about the Ninja 250 as an owner for four years to tell you that the carbs are a bitch to deal with and that Kawasaki's engineers did not make things easy for us. If you look through the mechanical section on Ninja250.org, a wealth of information when it comes to mechanical work, you find a lot of questions about dealing with carburetor issues.

I've ridden for five years, both summer and some winter days. The only time I ever had trouble getting a bike started was a bike with a carburetor, and it was a regular occurrence on that bike.

Last edited by GoIllini; 11-24-2012 at 09:19 AM.
GoIllini is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2012, 02:13 PM   #29 (permalink)
singram
500 G.P. Champion
 
singram's Avatar
 

Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Chicago
Posts: 2,234
Gameroom cash: $20735
Sportbike: CBR F4i / Kawi ZX6E
Thanks: 56
Thanked 457 Times in 282 Posts
singram is on a distinguished road
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by GoIllini View Post
Singram, a 250 struggles to turn over below freezing let alone getting around to worrying about the carbs.


So in other words, what you're really saying is that carbs require a bit of work and specific knowledge that isn't required quite as much of fuel injection. Good, we agree. We just disagree on how much.

We haven't yet mentioned the fact that the carbs are BURIED in the depths of the Ninja 250 (at least the old model) if you ever want to get them out for a total cleaning. This is not working on some '66 Corvette where you can take off the air filter and watch a stream of gasoline get sucked into the engine. This is taking half the bike apart, piece by piece, so you can move the back fender to move the battery box to move the air filter box, so you can get a wrench in there and undo four power-wrenched nuts, so you can get the carbs out to do a deep cleaning. Then carefully put all 30 similar looking screws back on to reassemble the bike. God help you if you messed something up and have to take everything back off. God help you if you lose one of those thirty screws and need to order one (The local dealer probably won't have it in stock; they didn't even have a clutch cable, a commonly used part, when I replaced mine a few years ago.) Or you can have a mechanic do it for you for ~$500+.

For those of us who ride motorcycles but do not LIVE motorcycles, the carbs on the Ninja 250 are a real bitch to deal with. I am guessing that it will be similar for a Ninja 500 and the new Ninja 250, but I could be wrong.

I don't disagree with your overall point. Carbs aren't that complicated and in all honesty I am a mechanically helpless yuppie who can do little more than change a clutch cable and the oil/oil filter and try to figure out where the other fluids go. On a good day, I can drain carb float bowls, replace a burnt out signal bulb, and maybe change the spark plugs if I'm lucky. Carbs are probably the most straightforward mechanical problem on a motorcycle that I can't deal with; they're sure as heck easier than trying to find a short. However, the Ninja 250 makes working on the carbs hell if you need to do a deep clean after 2-3 winters. To get a Ninja 250 through three years of regular use, you will need to learn how to do all of this, and you'll still need to visit the mechanic to change the chain and the rear tires. (I also have them handle the front tires; installing tires scares the heck out of me.)

To get a well-designed fuel injected bike through three years of regular use, it's a bit less work. It requires a lot less thinking. That's thinking and time and weekends that you can apply to your job or to riding or to other fun stuff.

It also looks like the Ninja 500 website agrees with me:

Carburetor Maintenance - EX-500.com

Carb maintenance "dominates the mechanical time you spend on your bike". In other words, want to spend fewer precious weekends cleaning carbs and more weekends riding? Get fuel injection!


You raise a good point here. Should you go with the devil you know or the devil you don't know?

The CBR 250 is about to be in its third model year and it's fuel injected. Maybe that's an option too.


OP, as you can see, owning a motorcycle requires a certain degree of mechanical commitment and on top of that still just as much time spent at the mechanic's shop, mile per mile. Instead of changing the oil every 6,000 miles, which you do yourself at home, you're getting new tires, or getting a new chain, or getting the 6,000 mile service as per the manual.
To be completely fair(and maybe somewhat of a hypocrite), I bought my first FI bike about a month ago (CBR F4i) and absolutely LOVE IT. The ability to turn the key and have full power RIGHT NOW, the smoothness of the revs, the consistency of the idle, etc. It may be a Honda thing, but it truly is a fine Swiss watch.

In my post above, I may have come off like a was placing carbed bikes above FI'd. Not so. I was more railing against the "Carbs are evil and must be killed with fire!" mentality, and the constant technical mis-information that seems to casually get tossed around on m/c forums.

Carbs are NOT easy to access on most faired sportbikes, you are right there, especially by the casual wrencher that would rather ride than spend a Saturday stuck in the garage. They can also be very temperamental.

I used to be an active member on EX500.com. The typical rider that would own such a bike isn't exactly made of money, and therefore becomes very acquainted with the mechanics of it. Since carbs count for a good 95% of performance issues(IMO), they are no exception. That carb procedure you posted is VERY extreme. I would call this a repair, not a maintenance task. In reality, once the rubber o-rings, rubber gaskets, and maybe the float jets_some sort of soft rubber volcanized material that mis shapes over time) are brought up to snuff, the rest is maintenace. All those internal rubber bits will fail with the same consistancy as any other rubber componant on your bike. IMO, carbed bikes still in service have gone through many inexperienced hands. Those rubber internal carb bits are either subject to varnished gas due to infrequent use, or typical rubber failure from 10s of years.

Carb maintenance really just entails keeping good/fresh gas circulating through 'em on a regular basis. Oh, and keeping your fuel filter up to par. Coincidentally EX500.com advocates adding an in-circuit fuel filter as one of your first mods to the bike. For some reason, its not included stock.

Once I learned the above with the Ninja500, I got the 600s carbs in order when I got the bike 4 years ago. With the exception of an occasional bottle of Seafoam, and some Stabil during the winter, I've never had to address the carbs. Its currently 30 degrees ATM, I'll bet any amount of money, I can get the bike started right now with no choke(throttle only).

Quote:
There is also some old wive's tale about this special carburetor cleaner fluid you can put in your gas tank that won't damage the Ninja 250's carburetor that will give you a partial but not complete cleaning.
Just that, old wives tail. You will never fully clear the jets and passages without full dis assembly and the use of a compressor.
__________________
Warm bodies, I sense, are not machines that can only make money…
excerpt from Pillar of Davidson

Last edited by singram; 11-24-2012 at 02:18 PM.
singram is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2012, 01:23 PM   #30 (permalink)
CoonDawg
Superbike Champion
 

Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: North Carolina
Age: 23
Posts: 336
Gameroom cash: $4593
Sportbike: '08 Suzuki SV650S
Thanks: 12
Thanked 81 Times in 33 Posts
CoonDawg is on a distinguished road
Default

While having ridden a cruiser for awhile, I would still be considered "new" to motorcycles, especially sportbikes. I bought an SV650 last week, and if there is one bit of advice I'd give you, it would to be to find something smaller if you can. I never would have believed such a tiny little engine could put out so much power, but it has twice the power as I had assumed. That's not really a problem if you don't use it, but it's kind of like holding a loaded gun; you can tell yourself all you want that it's not going to go off until you pull the trigger, but it's still a thought in the back of your mind. It's just another thing to be worried about while you're trying to learn how to ride it.
CoonDawg is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
sv650 vs FZ6 KingMidas New Riders 47 08-17-2007 10:18 AM
Sv650? Judderbar FZ6/FZ6R 39 10-19-2006 01:54 PM
FZ6 vs SV650 MrMischief FZ6/FZ6R 7 06-08-2005 01:50 AM
Sv650 ???? nedragr General Sportbikes 1 09-06-2002 02:11 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:32 AM.



Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.0.0
© 1997 - 2007 Sportbikes.net INC. All Rights Reserved.
Motorcycle News, Videos and Reviews
Honda Grom Forum Harley Davidson Honda 600RR Kawasaki Forum Yamaha R6
1199 Panigale Roadglide Forum Honda CBR1000 Vulcan Forum Yamaha R1
Ducati Monster Harley Forums Honda CBR250R ZX10R Forum Star Raider
Suzuki GSXR V-Rod Forums Honda Shadow Kawasaki Motorcycles Star Warrior
SV650 Forum BMW S1000RR Honda Fury Kawasaki Versys Drag Racing
Suzuki V-Strom BMW K1600 Triumph Forum Victory Forums Sportbikes
Volusia Forum BMW F800 Triumph 675 MV Agusta Forum Streetfighters